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CONTENTS. 



Part I. — Navy regulations relating to uniforms 7 

Part 11. — Officers' uniforms. 

Section 1 . < leneral regulations for officers' uniforms 11 

Section 2. Uniforms appropriate for ceremonious and other occasions la 

Section 8. Description of garments and equipments '2\ 

Part III. — Enlisted men's uniforms. 

Section 4. General regulations for enlisted men's uniforms - #> 

Descriptions of articles of eidisted men's uniforms 40 

Clothing lists ii.'' 



LIST OF PLATES: 



OFFICERS. 



I, II Special full dress. 

Ill Full dress. 

IV Dress. 

V Undress — A. 

VI Service dress. 

VII White service dress. 

VIII Evening dress — A and B. 

IX Mess dress and "Uniform C." 

X Overcoat. Cloak. 

XI Cocked hats, caps, and helmet. 

XII Epaulets. 

XIII, XIV Shoulder marks, shoulder knot, and shoulder strap. 

XV, XVI Collar devices. Buttons. 

XVII Sword, scabhard, undress belt, sword knot. 

X VIII Full-dress belts. ■ 

XIX ,. Mountings for full-dress belt. 

ENLISTED MEX. 

XX Blue dress. 

XXL White dress. 

XXII White working dress. 

XX II I Bandsmen's uniforms. 

XX IV Dungarees. Jersey. 

XXV, XXVI Overcoats. 

XXVII Pain clothes. 

XXVIII Caps. White hat. Helmet. 

XXIX Bating badges for blue clothing. 

XXX ^specialty marks on rating badges. 

XXXI Distinguishing marks. 

XXXII Bandmaster's equipments. 



Navy Department, 
Washington, January 21, 1905. 
The regulations published herewith shall govern the uniforms for 
officers and enlisted men of the Navy. 

Slight differences from the requirements of these regulations, in the 
shape and position of the pockets of the white service coat and in the 
cut of the evening dress waistcoat, blue or white, will bo allowed in 
garments already made, but not in those made hereafter. 

Articles of enlisted men's clothing made at the naval clothing fac- 
tory under the provisions of the regulations for uniforms published 
July 1, 1S 1 JT, shall continue to be issued and worn until the stock on 
hand is exhausted; but clothing made by the men themselves, or by 
tailors for them, must conform strictly to these regulations. 

Paul Morton, 

Secretary. 



INITIATIONS GOVERNING THE UNIFORM OF COMMISSIONED 
OFFICERS, WARRANT OFFICERS, AND ENLISTED MEN, 11)05. 



PART I. NAVY REGULATIONS RELATING TO UNIFORMS. 

Chapter ?>. section IB, United States Navy Regulations, 11*05, reads 
as follows: 

11)9. No decoration received from a foreign government shall be 
publicly shown or exposed upon the person of any officer. 

200. (1) The distinctive medals and badges adopted by societies of 
men who have served in the armies and navies of the United States 
in the war of the Revolution, the war of 1812, the Mexican war, the 
war of the rebellion, the Spanish-American war and the incident 
insurrection in the Philippines, and the Chinese relief expedition of 
1900, may be worn upon all occasions of ceremony by officers and 
men of the Army and Navy of the United States who are members of 
said organizations in their own right. 

(2) Medals presented by the Government of the United States to 
officers and enlisted men of the Navy shall be worn on occasions of 
ceremony, as prescribed in the regulations for uniforms. 

(B) The distinctive badge adopted by the Army and Navy Union 
of the United States of America may be worn upon all public occa- 
sions of ceremony by officers and enlisted men of the Army and Navy 
of the United States who are members of said organizations in their 
own right. 

(4) The metal badge of the Naval Temperance League may be worn 
by members of the league on occasions of general muster and cere- 
mony, or when going ashore on liberty. 

(5) Persons who, by right of inheritance and election, are members 
of any of the military societies referred to in paragraphs 1 and B of 
this article, are members thereof in their own right. 

201. Officers may dispense with wearing uniform when on duty at 
the Navy Department, Naval Observatory, under the Light-House 
Board, in the Coast Survey Office, and when employed on shore duty 
other than at navy yards and shore stations. 

202. (1) On all occasions of ceremony or duty and on social occasions 
when officers attend in an official capacity, uniforms shall be worn. 

(2) Chiefs of bureaus shall wear the uniform of rear-admiral upon 
all .occasions on which uniform is worn, the chiefs of staff bureaus 



8 NAVY REGULATIONS RELATING TO UNIFORMS. 

wearing the cap, shoulder, and sleeve ornaments of their respective 
corps, but of the grade of rear-admiral. 

203. Retired officers ordered to duty shall not be required to have 
any other uniform than service dress. 

204. In foreign ports on occasions of all reviews, public balls, enter- 
tainments given by naval or military authorities or messes, or by civil 
officials, and during all visits of ceremony, officers who attend from 
ships lying in the port shall appear in uniform. 

205. On board vessels other than those of the fourth rate, mess dress 
or evening dress-B shall be worn at dinner in the messes of commis- 
sioned and junior officers; except when the commanding officer shall 
substitute the uniform of the day, on account of bad weather at sea. 
coaling ship, or other special circumstances. All the members of any 
one mess shall appear in the same dress. After dinner, officers not on 
duty may appear on deck in the dress worn at mess. 

200. Undress uniform, without side arms and with gloves, shall be 
worn by all officers on the upper decks or in sight, when going in or 
out of port, unless overcoats, rain coats, or white service dress are 
prescribed. 

207. During divine service chaplains may wear the vestments of the 
church to which they belong. 

208. Swords shall always be worn at quarters and upon leaving a 
ship, navy yard, or station on military duty. When attending funerals 
the hilt shall be draped with black crape. 

209. The senior officer shall regulate daily the uniform for officers 
and men. He shall also prescribe the dress to be worn on all occasions 
mentioned in articles 202 and 204 and at such other times as he may 
deem proper. 

210. Plain clothes may be worn by officers as provided for in the 
uniform regulations. When in foreign ports discretion must be 
observed in granting this privilege. 

211. No member of the crew shall at any time, either on board ship 
or on shore, wear any dress but his prescribed uniform. Particular 
attention shall be paid that none but uniform underclothing is worn 
by the crew. 

212. Enlisted men of the Navy who have received medals of honor, 
life-saving medals, good-conduct medals, or any other medals pre- 
sented by the Government of tin 1 United States, shall wear them at 
general muster, Sunday inspection, and other occasions of dress cere- 
mony. 

528. lie" 'shall see that officers commanding divisions * * * keep 
correct clothing lists and make out necessary requisitions; that the 
issue of clothing and small stores is made by divisions; and that all 
issues are witnessed bv an officer, an officer in each division to witness 



"The executive otlieer, 



NAVY KEOTLATIONS KELATTNO TO UNIFORMS. U 

the issue to his division, if practicable; that officers are careful in their 
inspections of their divisions, their clothing and bedding. * * * 

552. lie" shall prepare a dress board on which will be indicated the 
uniform of the crew, and place it in a conspicuous position. 

(>42. (1) They* shall, in addition to carrying out the instructions 
already laid down for inspection, take special care that all outer and 
under clothing, overcoats, caps.' hats, and bedding of the men are, in 
respect to quality, pattern, and color, in accordance with the prescribed 
uniform. 

(2) They 6 shall see that all materials drawn are used for the purpose 
required; and that all clothing is neatly made, marked, and kept in 
order, and that none of it is sold; that the men are neat in person and 
clothing, and provided with regulation knives and lanyards; and that 
underclothing is worn at all times unless dispensed with by order of 
the captain. All work done by the ship's tailor shall be submitted to 
the division officer for inspection and approval before it is accepted or 
any payment made therefor. 

820. The members of the crew must, on all occasions, * * * 
lie neat in their persons? and dress; and each should endeavor by his 
own good conduct, respectful bearing, and zeal to promote tin 1 effi- 
ciency of the entire command. 

821. The use of .sheath knives on board ship by the crew is forbidden. 
Every man of the seaman branch shall carry a jackknife attached to a 
lanyard. 

824. * * * (2) Whenever recruits are received on board receiv- 
ing ships, they shall be required at once to have their hair cut. bathe, 
and report for phj'sical examination. Upon the completion of the 
examination, should the recruits qualify, commanding officers shall 
have the outfit of clothing issued to each and carefully marked. Com- 
manding officers shall not allow recruits to keep on board any article of 
clothing not authorized by regulations, except such underclothing as 
may be worn at the time of enlistment and is in good condition. All 
other citizens' clothing must be disposed of as the recruit ma} r desire. 

(3) He'' shall not allow clothing or small stores to be issued to 
recruits without his written order. 

911). " J * * (2) The captain may forbid the wearing of medals by 
any person undergoing punishment. 

1750. (L) An o liicer holding an acting appointment shall wear the 
uniform of the grade to which he is appointed, and shall affix the title 
of his acting rank to his official signature; when such duty ceases, he 
shall resume the uniform and title of his actual rank. 

(2) A commander in chief may issue an order to any officer to 
assume the rank and uniform of a grade to which he has been pro- 
moted, upon receiving satisfactory evidence of such promotion. 

■ « Tlic executive officer. ''The division officers. 'The captain. 



PART II.— OFFICERS' UNIFORMS. 
Section 1.— GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR OFFICERS' UNIFORMS. 

1. All persons belonging to the Navy must strictly conform to such 
regulations for uniforms as may be published from time to time by 
the Navy Department. Every person belonging to the Navy is strictly 
forbidden to wear any dress or decoration other than that to which his 
grade or the law entitles him. 

2. Officers on duty on board all ships of war of the United States 
and on board all receiving ships, Coast Survey vessels, and vessels of 
the Bureau of Fisheries, and at all navy yards and shore stations, will 
at all times wear the uniform of their respective grades. 

3. On all occasions of ceremony, when a commanding officer may 
deem it necessary to order the attendance of officers under his com- 
mand, he shall prescribe the uniform to be worn. 

4. (a) In orders prescribing the uniform to be worn, the designations 
(1) special full dress, (2) full dress. (3) dress, (4) undress-A, (5) undress- 
B, (6) service dress, (T) evening dress-A, (8) evening dress-B, (0) mess 
dress, and (10) uniform C, shall lie used. (See section 2. ) 

(b) Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps visiting the White House 
on occasions of ceremony shall wear uniform as follows: 

When " Uniform A" is designated — 

Navy, special full dress. 

Marine Corps, special full dress. 
When " Uniform B " is designated — 

Navy, service dress with side arms. 

Marine Corps, undress. 
When '* Uniform C" is designated — 

Navy, evening dress-A, with white waistcoat. 

Marine Corps, special full dress. 

(c) If white service coats, white trousers, white waistcoats, white 
helmets, or white caps are to be worn, the fact shall be stated; other- 
wise, it will be understood that the dress is to be all blue. When- 
ever white trousers are worn (except in "dress" uniform), white caps 
or helmets shall be prescribed. Overcoats may be ordered by the 
senior officer present in cold weather, to be worn over any of the fore- 
going uniforms. When overcoats are worn, epaulets shall be dis- 
pensed with. 

11 



12 UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 

(d) In foul weather, officers shall be permitted to wear rain clothes, 
except under special circumstances. 

5. Medals awarded to officers by the Government shall be worn with 
special full dress, full dress, dress, evening dress-A, and ""uniform CV 1 
on the left breast, to the left of and on a horizontal line between the 
second and third buttons of the special full dress and the frock coats 
and in a similar position on the evening dress coat. Other medals 
and badges authorized b} 7 the Navy Regulations may also be worn 
with these uniforms. Medals awarded by the Government shall be 
worn in place in the order of occurrence of the occasions which 
they respectively commemorate, counting from right to left. 

b*. Immediately after a vessel is commissioned and before proceed- 
ing to sea, the commanding officer shall ascertain and report to the 
Department whether any officer under his command is unprovided with 
his complete outfit of naval uniform and equipment. 

7. Officers serving on torpedo vessels shall not be required to wear 
other than service dress. 

8. The officer of the deck in port shall wear gloves and carry a 
binocular or spyglass. At sea he shall carry a deck trumpet. 

9. The cloak or mackintosh may be worn in inclement weather as a 
protection to epaulets and shoulder knots, except at drills and exercises. 

10. Officers on duty with enlisted men under arms on shore shall 
wear service dress, except on occasions of special ceremony, when 
special full dress or full dress is prescribed for other officers pres- 
ent, in which case the officers on cl n ty T with enlisted men shall wear 
"Undress- A," with leggings if prescribed. 

11. Officers on leave from their ships or shore stations are permitted 
to wear plain clothes, at the discretion of the senior officer present. 

L2. Officers are forbidden to wear any part of the naval uniform 
with plain clothes, except the overcoat, with shoulder marks removed, 
the cloak, helmet, or mackintosh. 

13. Retired officers will be permitted to wear the uniform of their 
grade as prescribed at the time of their retirement. 

11. Officers suspended from duty b} 7 sentence of a court-martial or on 
furlough for punishment are prohibited from wearing their uniforms 
during the period of such punishment. 

15. Sword belts shall be worn outside special full-dress and frock 
coats, inside overcoats and service dress coats, and underneath the 
evening dress waistcoat. 

16. The sword shall be habitually worn hooked up, guard to the 
rear, slings outside; with the overcoat it shall be worn outside, the 
long sling of the belt passing through the rear slit and the short sling 
through the side slit of the overcoat. The sword knot shall always be 
worn with the sword, by officers for whom it is prescribed. 



UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, IT. s. NAVY. 13 

17. When on duty with naval brigade or landing party, leggings arc 
to 1)0 worn, and such arms, equipments, and extra clothing as the nature, 
of the service may require. 

The haversack is worn in rear of loft hip; canteen in rear of right 
hip, with cartridge or sword belt over both haversack sling's and the 
rear sling- of the canteen. 

If officers carry the revolver, the sword belt is worn outside the 
service coat or overcoat, the carl ridge box in front, and to the right 
of the belt buckle. The revolver is worn slightly in rear of the right 
hip. The canteen is carried on the right side in rear of the revolver, 
with its rear sling under the sword belt. 

iiS. White gloves shall always be worn with the sword, except at 
sea or in exercises as infantry other than dress* parade. The senior 
officer present may prescribe white gloves at any time. 

1!>. Acting assistant surgeons appointed for three years 1 service in 
the Navy shall be required to provide themselves with the articles of 
uniform prescribed for service dress, blue and white, only. 



Section 2.— UNIFORMS APPROPRIATE FOR CEREMONIOUS AND 
OTHER OCCASIONS. 

SPECIAL FULL DRESS. (Pis. I and II.) 

When to he worn : 

1. State occasions at home and abroad. 

2. When- receiving or visiting the President of the United States, 
the sovereign or ruler of any country, or any member of a royal 
family, at ports at home and abroad. 

3. At ceremonies or entertainments when the senior officer present 
considers it desirable to do special honor to the occasion. 

4. At general muster on the first Sunday of every month, except in 
inclement or hot weather. 

5. Reception of an ex-President of the United States, the Vice- 
President, or the Secretary of the Navy. 

0. When '"Uniform A" is prescribed, on occasions of ceremony 
where officers of the Navy and Army appear together. 

For all commissioned officers, e,rcej>t cha plains, chief boatswains, chief 
gunners, chief carpenters , and ch ief sail makers : 
Special full-dress coat. 
Full-dress trousers. 
Cocked hat. 
Epaulets. 

Sword and full-dress belt. 
White gloves. 
Medals and badges. 
For the commissioned officers excepted ahoee, and for icarrant officers, 
' mates, and clerks: 
The same as wl Undress- A." 
For midshipmen : The same as "Full dress." 

FULL DRESS. (PL III.) 
When to he worn: 

1. On occasions of ceremony, such as making a first visit to officers 
of flag rank, or exchanging visits of ceremony with foreign officials. 
Jn hot weather, where offense would not thereby be given, white service 
dress will be prescribed instead. 

2. At ceremonies or entertainments where the senior officer present 
considers that the dress uniform is not sufficient. 

2912—05 2 15 



10 UNIFORM FOK OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 

For all conuitissioned officers, excerpt cli.aplains, chief boatswains, chief 
(/turners, chief carpenters, and chief sailmakers: 
Frock coat. 
Full dress trousers. 
Cocked hat. 
Epaulets. 

Sword and full-dress belt. 
Scarf. 

White gloves. 
Medals and badges. 

Foe the commissioned officers accepted above* and for warrant officers, 

mates, and clerks: 

The same as "Undress- A." 
For midshipio en : 

The same as prescribed for commissioned officers, substituting the 
blue cap for the cocked hat and shoulder knots for epaulets. 

DRESS. (VI. IV.) 
When to be worn: 

1. The reception of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy; a member 
of the President's Cabinet other than the Secretary of the Navy; the 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States; a governor- 
general of islands, or groups of islands, occupied by the United States, 
visiting officially, the ship being within the islands of which he is 
governor-general; a governor of one of the States or Territories of 
the United States, or an island under the control of the United States, 
the ship being within the waters of the State, Territory, or island of 
which he is governor; the President of the Senate; a committee of 
Congress; the Speaker of the House of Representatives; an ambassa- 
dor of the United States, an envo} 7 " extraordinary and minister pleni- 
potentiary of the United States, a minister resident or a diplomatic 
representative of or above the rank of charge d'affaires, the vessel 
being within the waters of the nation to which he is accredited; a flag- 
officer going on board his flagship to assume command, or relinquishing 
command. 

2. The tirst visit in port to commanding officers, and ordinary occa- 
sions of duty and ceremoiry on shore. In hot weather, where offense 
would not thereby be given, the senior officer present will prescribe 
white service dress instead. 

3. At Sunda}^ morning inspections, except on the tirst Sunday of 
the month. In hot or inclement weather the senior officer present 
will prescribe other uniform. 



UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 17 

i^>/' «// commissioned officer*, except clmplains, chief boatswain*, chief 
gannerx, chief carpenters, and chief sailmakers: 
Frock coat. 

Undress trousers (white trousers may be proscribed). 
Cocked hat. 
Epaulets. 

Sword and undress belt. 
Scarf. 

White gloves. 
Medals and badges. 

For the co?nmis,sioaed officers excepted above, and for warrant officer*, 

'/nates, and clerks: 

The same as ''Undress- A.'' 
For midshipmen: 

The same as prescribed for commissioned officers, substituting the 
blue, cap for cocked hat, and shoulder knots for epaulets. 

UNDRESS-A. (PI. V.) 
When to be worn: 

1. When reporting for duty. 

2. When serving on courts or boards, except boards of survey, or 
as witnesses before same. The president or senior member of the 
court or board may prescribe service dress in hot weather. 

3. Upon occasions of special ceremony, by officers on duty with 
enlisted men under arms on shore, when the uniform prescribed for 
other officers is special full dress or full dress. 

4. Upon other occasions, when prescribed by the commanding 
officer. 

For all commissioned offices: 

Frock coat. 

Undress trousers (white trousers may be prescribed). 

Blue cap (white cap or helmet may be prescribed). 

Shoulder straps. 

Sword and undress belt (except for chaplains). 

Scarf. 

White gloves. 
For m ids hij mien, warrant officers, mates, and clerks: 
The same, without shoulder straps. 

HNDRESS-B. 

The same as ''Undress-A," without sword or belt. 
When to be worn : 

1. When calling on foreign officers other than commanding officers. 
In hot weather, where offense would not thereby be given, the senior 
officer present will prescribe white service dress instead. 



18 UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 

2. At daytime receptions which are not formal, but to which officers 
are invited in their official capacity, and when frock coats are appro- 
priate. 

3. On the deck of a vessel going in or out of port, unless overcoats, 
rain clothes, or white service dress are prescribed. 

SERVICE DRESS. (PL VI.) 
When to be worn : 

1. When "Uniform B v is prescribed, on occasions of ceremony 
where officers of the Navy and Army appear together. 

2. At all times not otherwise provided for. 

For all officers: 

Service coat. 

Undress trousers (white trousers may be prescribed). 
Blue cap (white cap or helmet shall be prescribed with white 
trousers, and may be prescribed with blue trousers). 

WHITE SERVICE DRESS. (PL VII.) 

When to be worn; 

At all times not otherwise provided for, and instead of other uni- 
forms in hot weather, on occasions of ceremony, when offense would 
not thereby be given, if prescribed by the senior officer present. 
For all corn missioned officers and for midshipmen: 
White service coat. 
White trousers. 

White cap (helmet may bo prescribed). 
Shoulder marks. 
For warrant officers, mates, and clerks: 
The same, without shoulder marks. 

EVENING DRESS- A. (PL VIII.) 
When to be worn: 

On occasions of ceremony in the evening, to which officers are 
invited in their official capacity, such as public balls, dinners, and 
evening receptions, except that where hot weather and other circum- 
stances make it appropriate, the senior officer will prescribe mess 
dress with full-dress trousers. 

For all commissioned officers, except chaplain*, chief boatswains, chief 
(/tinners, chief carpenters, and chief sailmakers: 

Evening dress coat. 

Evening dress waistcoat, blue. 

Full-dress trousers. 

Cocked hat. 

Epaulets. 

Sword and full-dress belt. 

Black tie. 

White gloves. 



UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 19 

The senior officer present may prescribe " Evening dress- A" with- 
out swords or belts, in which case blue caps shall be worn instead of 
cocked hats, on occasions when such uniform would be appropriate. 
The belt shall not be worn without the sword. 
For chaplains: 

The same as ''Evening dress-B." 

For in idshipmen : 

The same as prescribed for commissioned officers, substituting the 
blue cap for the cocked hat and shoulder knots for epaulets. 

EVENING DEESS-B. (PL VIII.) 
When to be loom: 

1. In the evening, on social occasions to which officers are invited in 
their official capacity, except that where hot weather and other cir- 
cumstances make it appropriate, the senior officer present will prescribe 
mess dress instead. 

2. At dinner on board vessels other than those of the fourth rate, 
by officers for whom the evening dress coat is prescribed, except when 
the uniform of the day has been white; mess dress may bo substituted. 
at the discretion of the commanding officer. 

For all commissioned officers, except chief boatswains, chief gunners, 
chief carpenters, and chief sal I?} takers, and for midshipmen : 
Evening dress coat. 

Evening- dress waistcoat, blue (white ma} T be prescribed). 
Undress trousers (full-dress trousers may be prescribed). 
Blue cap. 
Black tie. 

MESS DRESS. (PI. IX.) 
When to be worn: 

1. On ordinaiy social occasions in the evening, to which officers are 
invited in their official capacity, and where hot weather or other cir- 
cumstances make it appropriate. 

2. At dinner on board vessels other than those of the fourth rate, 
by officers for whom the mess jacket is prescribed, when the uniform of 
the day has been white, or, at the discretion of the commanding officer, 
instead of evening dress-B. 

For all commissioned officers, except chief boatswains, chief gunners, 
chief carpenters, and chief saihnahers, and for midshipmen ; 
Mess jacket. 

White evening dress waistcoat. 
Undress trousers (white trousers or full-dress trousers may be 

prescribed). 
Shoulder marks. 
White cap. 
Black tie. 



20 ITNIKOKM VOU OFFICERS, [T. S. NAVY. 

UNIFORM C. (PI. IX.) 

The same :is '•'Evening dress-A," with white waistcoat. 

When to he worn: 

1. At the White House, when prescribed. 

2. As a substitute for "Evening dress-A/' at the discretion of the 
senior officer present. 

The senior officer present may prescribe "Uniform C" without 
swords or belts, in which case blue caps shall be worn instead of 
cocked hats, on occasions when such uniform would be appropriate. 
The belt shall not be worn without the sword. 



Section 3.— DESCRIPTION OF GARMENTS AND EQUIPMENTS. 

SPECIAL FULL-DRESS COAT. (Pis. land II.) 

For all com mi 'sstoned officers, except chaplain** chief l/oatmimins, chief 

gunnel's, chief carpenters , and elcief mihuakers: 

The special full-dress coat shall be of dark navy-blue cloth, double- 
breasted, lined with white silk serge; the waist of the coat to descend 
to the top of the hip bone; the skirts to begin about one-fourth of 
the circumference from the middle of the front edge and to descend 
four-fifths of the distance from the hip bone to the knee, with two large 
nav} r buttons on the waist behind and one near the bottom of each fold; 
two rows of large navy buttons on the breast, nine in each row, the 
rows placed -±i to 5£ inches apart from e} r e to eye at top and 2^ inches 
at bottom; the cull's of the coat to be closed, without buttons: standing 
collar to hook in front at bottom and to slope thence upward and back- 
ward at an angle of 25 degrees on each side, and to rise no higher than 
will permit a free movement of the chin over it. All seams to be 
plain. Shoulder attachments for epaulets to be of cloth and silk, or 
of brass attachments, neatly laid on. 

The collar shall be covered, around the top and down the front, with 
navy gold wire or thread lace, of two vellums, laid on according to 
pattern (Pis. I and II), in width as follows: 

Admiral of the Navy and officers of the rank of rear-admiral. If 
inches. 

Officers of the rank of captain or commander, 1^ inches. 

Officers of the rank of lieutenant-commander, lieutenant, or lieu- 
tenant, junior grade, 1 inch. 

Officers of the rank of ensign, £ inch. 

The sleeves shall bear stripes of gold lace, the lower edge of the lace 
to be 2 inches from and parallel to the edge of the sleeve, the number 
and width of the stripes to be as follows: 

Admiral of the Navy — two stripes of 2-inch lace, with one stripe of 
1-inch lace between, the stripes set \ inch apart. 

Rear-admiral — one stripe of 2-inch lace, with one stripe of ^-inch 
lace set i inch above it. 

Captain — four stripes of i-inch lace, set £ inch apart. 

Commander — three stripes of i-inch lace, set i inch apart. 

Lieutenant-commander — two stripes of i-inch lace, with one stripe 
of i-inch lace between, the stripes set \ inch apart. 

21 



22 UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, V, S. NAVY. 

Lieutenant -two stripe* of i-inch lace, set i inch apart. 

Lieutenant, junior grade one stripe of ^-ineh lace, with one stripe 
of i-ineh hice set | \wh above it. 

Ensign — one stripe of i-inch lace. 

Line officer* to wear a star of five rays embroidered in gold, 1 inch 
in diameter, on the sleeves, midway between the seams, with oik 1 of 
the rays pointing directly downward, and the point i inch from the 
upper edge of the upper stripe of lace. 

Staff officers to wear the same stripes as those prescribed for line 
officers with whom they rank, but not the stars. The corps to which 
they respectively belong shall be indicated by bands of colored cloth 
around the sleeves, tilling the intervals between the gold lace stripes, 
the colors and materials to be as follows: 

Medical officers — dark maroon velvet. 

Pay officers — white cloth. 

Professors of mathematics — olive green cloth. 

Naval constructors — dark violet cloth. 

Civil engineers — light blue velvet. 

Where but one stripe of lace is worn, the colored cloth shall show 
\ inch above and below the stripe. 

FROCK COAT. (Pis. Ill, IV, and V.) 

For all officers* except cJiaplalns* the frock coat shall be of dark 
nav} T -blue cloth, faced with the same and lined with black serge, 
double-breasted, made with two rows of large navy buttons on the 
breast, nine in each row, to button lower six buttons, the rows placed 
4^ to 5i inches apart from eye to eye at top and 2i inches at bottom; 
rolling collar; skirts to be full, and to descend four-fifths of the dis- 
tance from the hip bone to the knee, with two large navy buttons at 
the waist behind and one near the bottom of each fold; cuffs to be 
closed, without buttons. Shoulder attachments for epaulets to be of 
cloth and silk, or of brass attachments, neatly laid on. All seams to 
be plain. 

For chaplains* the frock coat shall be of dark navy-blue cloth, faced 
with the same and lined with black silk serge, single-breasted, made to 
button to the neck, with one row of medium size plain. Hat, black, silk 
buttons on the breast, seven in number; plain standing collar; skirts 
to be full, and to descend four-fifths of the distance from the hip bone 
to the knee, with two buttons at the waist behind; cuffs to be closed, 
without buttons. All seams to be plain. 

(■Jiaj^laiiis* warrant officers* mate** aad clerks shall wear on the collar 
on each side, in the position shown in PI. V. the following devices, 
-respectively: 

Chaplain a Latin cross, embroidered in silver and inclined back- 
ward at an angle of 15 with the vertical (PI. XVI, tig. 1). 



UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. 8. NAVY. 23 

Boatswain two foul anchors crossed, embroidered in gold (PI. XV, 
tig. i>, shows design in silver). 

Gunner— a Hauling spherical shell, embroidered in gold, the Ihnne 
horizontal and pointing to the rear (Pis. V and XV, tig. 10). 

Carpenter — a chevron, point down, embroidered in gold (PI. XV, 
fig. 11). 

Saihuaker — a diamond, embroidered in gold (PI. XV, tig. 12); 

Warrant machinist — a three-bladed propeller, embroidered in gold, 
one blade vertical and pointing up (PI. XVI, tig. 2). 

Pharmacist — a Geneva cross, embroidered in gold (PI. XVI, fig. 3). 

Mate — a binocular glass, embroidered in gold, with less than twenty 
years' service as mate (PI. XVI, tig. 4); in silver, after twenty years* 
service as mate. 

Clerks — pay corps device embroidered in gold (PI. XVI, tig. 5). 

Sleeve mark* to be as follows: 

For chaplain — stripes of lustrous black braid, of the same size, num- 
ber, and disposition as for line officers of the same rank. 

For chief boatswains and chief gunners the same as for ensimi 
(star and one stripe of ^-inch lace) except that the gold lace shall be 
woven with dark blue silk thread, for widths of ^ inch, at intervals of 
2 inches; if retired with the rank of lieutenant, junior grade, one 
stripe of |-inch lace with one of i-ineh lace set i inch above it; the 
lace to be woven with dark blue silk thread, as prescribed above. 

For chief carpenter and chief sailmaker — the same as for chief 
boatswain, but without the stars. 

For midshipmen — the same as for ensign, except that the stripe of 
gold lace shall be ^ inch wide. 

For boatswains, gunners, and mates — the stars prescribed for other 
line officers, placed 4 inches from the edge of the sleeve, but no stripes. 

For all other officers — the same as prescribed for the special full- 
dress coat. 

SERVICE COAT. (PI. VI.) 

For all officers the service coat shall be of dark navy-blue cloth or 
serge, shaped to the figure, to descend to top of inseam of trousers; 
a slit over each hip extending on the right side ~> inches from the 
bottom of the coat, and on the left side as high as the position of the 
lower edge of the sword belt; single breasted, with a fly front fitted 
with plain flat buttons of black gutta-percha, or similar material, and a 
standing collar. The collar, edges of the coat, side seams of the back 
from the shoulder to the lower edge of the skirt, and edges of the hip 
slits to 5 inches from bottom of coat shall be trimmed with lustrous 
black mohair braid 1\ inches wide laid on flat, beside which, at a dis- 
tance of ^ of an inch, with an overhand turn f of an inch in diameter 
at each change of direction, a narrow black silk braid -\ of an inch 
wide, shall be placed. All seams to be plain. 



24 UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. 8. NAVY. 

The slecre mark* shall bo the same us those prescribed for the frock 
coat. 

The collar shall bear devices indicating rank and corps, as follows 
(PI. XV): 

Admiral of the Navy — four silver stars, i\ inches between centers, 
one ray pointing' upward, with a gold foul anchor under the first and 
fourth stars, the crowns of the anchors pointing toward each other. 

Rear-admiral — two silver stars, \\ inches between centers, one ray 
pointing upward, and a silver foul anchor. (Fig. 1.) 

Captain — a silver spread eagle and a silver foul anchor. (Fig. 2.) 

Commander- — a silver oak leaf and a silver foul anchor. 

Lieutenant-commander — a gold oak leaf and a silver foul anchor. 

Lieutenant — two silver bars and a silver foul anchor; distance 
between bars to be the width of a bar; all bars at right angles to upper 
edge of collar, 

Lieutenant, junior grade — a silver bar and a silver foul anchor. 

Ensign — a silver foul anchor. 

Stuff officer*. — Same as for line officers with whom they rank, but 
with the substitution of the proper corps device for the anchor. 
(Figs. 3 to 8.) 

Chief boatswain — two foul anchors crossed, embroidered in silver. 
(Fig. 9.) 

Chief gunner — a flaming spherical shell embroidered in silver, 
flame horizontal and pointing to the rear. (Fig. 10.) 

Chief carpenter — a chevron, point down, embroidered in silver. 

(Fig. n.) _ 

Chief sailmaker — a diamond embroidered in silver. (Fig. 12.) 

Chief boatswains, chief gunners, chief carpenters, and chief sail- 
makers, retired with the rank of lieutenant, junior grade — the same, 
respectively, as above, with a silver bar in addition. 

Midshipman — a gold foul anchor. 

Warrant officers, mates, and clerks — the same as on the collar of 
the frock coat. 

Collar devices for the service coat shall be embroidered in high relief 
upon dark-blue nav} T cloth, which shall be stitched to the braid of the 
collar. They shall be 1 inch in height, with other dimensions propor- 
tionate, all conforming to the patterns shown in PI. XV. The anchor 
shall be placed with the shank parallel to the upper edge of the collar, 
crown to the front. Devices representing a leaf or a sprig of leaves 
shall be placed with the axes parallel to the upper edge of the collar, 
stem to the front, an acorn, if any, on the upper side. The front edge 
of the rank device to be ^ inch from the front edge of the collar, the 
corps device to be f inch in rear of the rear edge of rank device. 



UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, V. S. NAVY. 25 

WHITE SERVICE COAT. (PI. VII.) 

For all officers the white service coat shall be similar in cut and lit 
to the blue service coat and shall be made of white linen duck, white 
bleached cotton twill, or similar material, but without braid for trim- 
ming and without fly front, but with slits over the hips, as in the blue 
service coat; the front to be fitted to button through with five large- 
size gilt navy buttons (for chaplains* plain, flat, white buttons instead); 
the standing collar to be closed in front and fitted with a hook and 
eye at base and top, to be from 1 to 2 inches in height and to be of sev- 
eral thicknesses in order to admit of being worn without a linen collar; 
to have on each breast an outside patch pocket, the top of each to be 
abreast the second button, dimensions about 4^ to 6£ inches, without 
pleat, lower corners slightly rounded, with a flap at top from 2i to 2£ 
inches deep, shield shaped, and to button with a small-size gilt navy 
button; to be fitted on the shoulder for shoulder marks as required. 
No marks on collar or sleeves, but all commissioned officers and mid- 
shipmen shall wear shoulder marks with this coat. 

EVENING DRESS COAT AND WAISTCOAT. (Pl.VTII.) 

For all com missioned officers, except chief boatsioains, chief gunners, 
chief carpenters, and chief sailmakers, and for midshipmen: 
The evening dress coat shall be a body coat of dark navy-blue cloth, 
faced with the same, lined with black silk serge, double breasted, cut 
to the figure, with rolling collar; three large navy buttons on each 
breast, two at the waist behind and one near the bottom of each fold; 
closed cuff, without buttons. For chaplaiiis the coat shall have plain, 
flat, black silk buttons instead. Shoulder attachments for epaulets to 
be of cloth and silk, neatly laid on. The evening dress coat shall 
always be worn open. All seams to be plain. Sleeve marks to be the 
same as those prescribed for the frock coat; no marks on collar. 

The waistcoat to be of dark navy-blue cloth, single-breasted, rolling 
collar, with four small gilt navy buttons, all to conform to pattern. 
For chap>lains it shall have plain, flat, black silk buttons. 

The white evening dress waistcoat (PI. IX) to be the same as the blue 
evening dress waistcoat, but made of white linen duck or similar 
material. For chaplains the same, but with plain, flat, white buttons. 

MESS JACKET. (PI. IX.) 

For all commissioned officers, except eh ief boatswains, chief gunners, 
chief carpenters, and chief sailmakers, and for midshipmen: 
To be made of white linen duck or similar material, body of jacket 
to be cut similar to body of evening dress coat, but to descend only to 
the hips, to be slightly roached over the hips with a peak behind; two 
buttonholes on each side below the lapel, about 3 inches apart and 
about \ inch from the edge; two medium-size navy gilt buttons on 



26 UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 

each side below the lapel abreast the buttonholes and 2 inches from 
the edge; to be worn with two medium-size navy gilt buttons, con- 
nected by a ring", and buttoned through the upper buttonholes to make 
the edges of the jacket meet; to be fitted for shoulder marks; which 
will always be worn with this jacket. No marks on sleeves or collar. 
The whole to conform to pattern. For chaplains, plain flat white 
buttons. 

UNDRESS WAISTCOAT. 

For optional wear under the frock or the service coat: 

To be of dark navy-blue cloth or serge, or of white linen duck or 
similar material, single-breasted, without collar, cut high in front, 
with six small gilt navy buttons, the upper one to be not more than 4 
inches below the collar button in the neckband of the shirt. For 
chaplains, it shall have plain flat buttons, black silk for the blue and 
white for the white. 

FULL DRESS TROUSERS. 

For all commissioned officer* except chaplains, chief boatswains, chief 
gunners, chief carpenters, and chief sail makers, and for midshipmen : 
To be of dark navy-blue cloth, with a stripe of gold lace covering 
the outside seam of each leg, the lace to be of the same width and 
pattern as that on the collar of the special full dress coat. For mid- 
shipmen the lace to be \ inch wide. 

UNDRESS TROUSERS. 
For all officers: 

To be of dark navy-blue cloth, all seams to be plain. Dark navy- 
blue serge trousers, all seams plain, may be worn with a serge service 
coat. 

WHITE TROUSERS. 
For all officer's: 

To be of white linen duck, cotton twill, or similar material, all 
seams to be plain. 

OVERCOAT. (PI. X.) 
For all officers: 

The overcoat shall be an ulster, of dark nav3'-blue cloth (smooth- 
faced), lined with dark-blue or black material, the bottom of the skirt 
9 to 12 inches from the ground, double-breasted, made to button to the 
neck, with rolling collar of the same material as the coat, and so broad 
that when turned up it will protect the ears; seven plain, flat black but- 
tons on each front, 1^ inches in diameter, the lower buttons to be placed 
as low as the knee, the others to be equally spaced up to the throat; 
an outside pocket in each breast, the openings to be up and down, and 
the lower part of the opening to be level with the elbow; an up-and- 
down slit over the left hip long enough to allow the short sling of the 
sword belt to pass through it and the sword to be hooked up (about 4 



UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 27 

inches); slit to be strengthened on inside by suitable material. All 
seams to be plain. 

Overcoats shall be made full in the back and fitted with two straps 
let into the side seams in the back above the hips; the right .strap shall 
have two small buttons of the overcoat pattern, about 2 inches apart, 
and the left strap two corresponding buttonholes the same distance 
apart. The rear slit of the overcoat shall extend not more than 25 
inches nor less than 20 inches from the bottom of the garment, and with 
the right flap on the outside. 

A hood of the same material as the coat, made to button around the 
neck under the collar, and large enough to cover the head and cap, 
may be worn attached to the coat in extremely cold weather, or when 
prescribed by the senior officer present. 

Sleeve marks, to indicate rank onlj", to consist of stripes of lustrous 
black braid, of the same number, width, and disposition as the gold 
lace stripes on the sleeves of the service coat. 

Shoulder marks to be worn on the overcoat, except by warrant offi- 
cers, mates, and clerks. 

CLOAK. (PI. X). 

The cloak is to be cut three-fourths of a circle, of a length to reach 
to the ends of the fingers when the arms are hanging naturally by the 
.side, to be made of the material and lining prescribed for overcoats, 
with a rolling collar of the same material as the cloak, from 3i inches 
to 4^ inches wide; to be fastened at the neck bj T a hook and eye, and 
to have one frog laid on, conforming to pattern. 

MACKINTOSH. 

The mackintosh is to be of black material, with a rolling collar 3 
inches wide of the same material as the garment, bottom of the skirt 
to reach to within 9 to 12 inches from the ground, to be fitted with a 
cape to reach to the ends of fingers when the arms are hanging 
naturally at the side, to be without sleeves, and with the shoulders 
cut to admit of wearing epaulets or shoulder knots. 

COCKED HAT. (PI. XI.) 

For the Admiral of the 2savy: 

A rigid cocked hat of black silk beaver, dimensions as follows: 
Five to 5£ inches high on the left fan, 4 to 4i inches high on the right 
fan, and between 16 to 18 inches long from peak to peak. In the fold 
at each end of the hat to be placed a tassel of 5 gold bullions underlaid 
by 5 blue bullions; a strip of 2-inch gold lace, to be laid on flat around 
the outer rims of the fans, passing under the peaks. 

On the right fan a black silk cockade 3£ inches in diameter. Over 
the cockade a loop formed of two parts of 1^-inch gold lace. Above the 
V formed at the lower end of the loop by folding over the lace, a large- 
sized navy button shall be fastened. The point of the loop shall touch 



28 UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 

the middle of the lower rim of the fan, and the loop shall slope upward 
and forward at an angle of 35 degrees from the vertical, the ends being- 
carried over the rim of the fan. (Fig. 3.) 
For officers of the rank of rear-admiral : 

The same as above, but the strip of gold lace around the outer rims 
to be \\ inches wide. 
For other commissioned officers, except chaplains, chief boatswains, chief 

gunners, chief carpenters, and chief sail?/ wkers: 

The same as above, but in lieu of gold lace on the outer rims a strip 
of black silk lace 2i inches wide, binding the rims of the fans and 
showing li inches on each side and under the peaks, shall be worn. 

The cockade to be the same as above, except that the width of the 
lace of the loop shall be that prescribed for the collar of the special 
full-dress coat of the wearer. (Fig. 1, rank of captain.) 

BLUE CAP. (PI. XL) 
For all officers: 

The cap to be of dark navy-blue cloth, the diameter at the top to be 
i inch greater than that at the base, the quarters not less than 1^ nor 
more than li inches high, and of the same height in front and at the 
back. The seam around the top shall be made without a welt, and 
neatly stitched on each side. The band shall be 1^ inches wide with a 
welt -^ of an inch in diameter at the top and bottom. The bottom 
welt shall be <Jt inch from the base of the cap. A band of lustrous 
black mohair braid, similar to that used for the trimmings of the 
service coat, shall be worn between upper and lower welt, the upper 
edge of mohair band being left unsewn to admit of bottom edge of 
white cover to be slipped under when required. The visor shall be of 
black patent leather, molded to shape and bound with the same; shall 
be green underneath, rounded and sloping downward not less than 20 
degrees nor more than 30 degrees from the horizontal. The inside 
band shall be of leather, and shall extend from the base of the cap to 
within 1 inch of the top. The sweat lining shall be of morocco. 
Four black metal eyelets, two on each side, shall be placed above the 
band, in the quarters, for ventilation. A small-sized navy button shall 
be placed on each side be} T ond the ends of the visor, the eye of the 
button immediatel} T above the lower welt. (Fig. 2.) 

The cap device for commissioned officers to be a silver shield, embla- 
zoned paleways of 13 pieces, with a chief strewn with stars, sur- 
mounted by a silver spread-eagle, the whole placed upon two crossed 
foul anchors in gold. To be embroidered on stiffened dark-blue cloth 
in high relief. Attached to front of cap with center over upper welt, 
upper half loose, to admit white cover. For tear rant officers* mates* 
and clerks, two gold foul anchors crossed as a device, mounted as 
above. (Fig. 10.) 



UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, IT. S. NAVY. 2D 

The chin strap for all commissioned officers, except chujdams, and 
for midshipmen, to bo a sliding- .strap of leather, faced with ^-inch 
gold lace, with two gold laee slides of the same width. To be fas- 
tened over the buttons. When not used under the chin, to be drawn 
between the buttons, resting- on the upper edge of the visor. For 
chaplain*, the same as above, but to be of lustrous black mohair. 
(Fig. 8.) For warrant officer*, mate*, ami clerks, the same as for com- 
missioned officers, except that the strap is to be \ inch in width. 
(Fig-. 10.) 

Visor ornaments: For the Admiral of the JS 7 anj and rear-admirals, 
sprays of oak leaves with acorns, embroidered in gold on blue cloth, 
as shown in tig. 4, PI. XI; For staff officers of the rank of 'rear-admiral, 
gold bands, £ inch wide, embroidered on blue cloth, as shown in 
tig. I), PI. XI. For captains and commanders, sprays of oak leaves 
and acorns embroidered in gold on blue cloth along the front edge of 
the visor, as shown in tig. 5, PI. XI. For staff officers of the rank 
of captain or commander, except chaplains, a gold band, \ inch wide, 
embroidered on blue cloth along the front edge of the visor, as shown 
in tig. T, PI. XI. For chaplains, the same as for other staff officers of 
equal rank, except that the band is to be of lustrous black mohair, as 
shown in tig. 8, PI. XI. For other officers, the visor to be plain, as 
shown in figs, d and 10, PI. XI. 

WHITE CAP. (PI. XL) 

For all officers the white cap shall present the same appearance as 
the blue cap, except that the top shall be white above the black mohair 
band. Either the blue cap, with a cover made of white linen duck or 
similar material, fitted closely over the top and behind the device and 
mohair band, ma} T be worn, or a skeleton cap, with device, mohair 
band, visor, and visor ornaments the same as on the blue cap, but the 
top and quarters of the cap made of white linen duck or similar 
material. (Fig. 2, PI. XL) 

HELMET. (PI. XL) 

For all officers the helmet shall be made of cork, pith, or grass, the 
crown to measure (in the curve), from the lower edge of the outside 
band below the strap buttons to the center of the ventilator on top of 
the crown, not less than (i nor more than Of inches. The brim at- the 
front shall not be less than 2\ nor more than 2^ inches wide, and shall 
diminish in width to 1 inch on each side at the middle of the crown; 
the brim at the back shall be || of an inch wider than that in front, and 
shall diminish to 1 inch on the sides at the middle of the crown; the 
droop of the brim at the front shall not be less than 48 degrees nor 
more than 5(5 degrees, back not less than 45 degrees nor more than 48 
degrees, sides not less than 55 degrees. The covering of the helmet 



30 UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, IT. S. NAVY, 

shall be of white jean, with a band at the base of the crown of the 
same material, f of an inch wide and stitched on each side; one small 
navy button, detachable, in the band on each side at the middle and a 
thin white patent-leather chin strap in front, f- of an inch wide; the 
sweat band of uncolored morocco, with a ventilating space between it 
and the bod} 7 of the crown; the brim lined with green silk and bound 
with white patent leathei ; the crown unlined. (Fig. 11, PL XL) 

EPAULETS. (PI. XI L.) 

For nil commissioned officers, except chaplains, chief boatswains, 
chief gunners, chief carpenters, and chief sailmakers: 

To conform to the patterns shown in PL XII. 

For the Admiral of the Navy and officers of the rank of rear-admiral, 
the strap is to be 2f inches wide and G inches long; frog 4f inches 
wide; crescent \\ inch in broadest part; bullions to be 3^ inches long 
and £ inch in diameter. 

For officers of the rank of captain or com.//umde/\ the same as above, 
except the bullions to be 3 inches long and | inch in diameter. 

For officers of or heloin the rank of lieutenant-commander, the strap 
is to be 2i inches wide, 6 inches long; frog If inches; crescent \\ inch 
in the broadest part; bullions 3 inches long, f inch in diameter. 

EPAULET DEVICES. 

Admiral of the Navy — four silver stars of 5 rays each, equidistant 
from each other, in the middle of the frog, with a gold foul anchor 
1^ inches long under each outer star. 

Rear-admiral — two silver stars of 5 rays each, one near each end of 
the frog, with a silver foul anchor in the center. (See PL Xll show- 
ing epaulet for right shoulder.) 

Captain — a silver spread-eagle in the center of the frog, with a silver 
fotil anchor at each end. (See PL XII.) 

Commander — a silver oak leaf at each end of the frog, with a silver 
foul anchor in the center. 

Lieutenant-commander — a gold oak leaf at each end of the frog, 
with a silver foul anchor in the center. 

Lieutenant — two silver bars at each end of the frog, with a silver 
foul anchor in the center. 

Lieutenant, junior grade — a silver bar at each end of the frog, with 
a silver foul anchor in the center. 

Ensign — a silver foul anchor in the center. (See PL XII, showing 
epaulet for right shoulder.) 

Staff officers the same as for line officers with whom they rank, but 
substituting for the foul anchor, corps devices as follows. (See PL 
XV, for patterns of corps devices.) Medical officers a spread oak leaf 
embroidered in dead gold, with an acorn leaf embroidered in silver 



UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 31 

upon it (tig. 8). Pay officer* — a .silver oak sprig 1 (tig. 4). Professors 
of matlo matic* — oik 1 silver oak leaf and an acorn (tig. 6). Navttl con- 
structor* — a gold sprig of two live-oak leaves and an a^corn. Civil 
engineers — two crossed silver sprigs, each composed of two live-oak 
leaves and an acorn (tig. S). 

The Admiral of the Navy's secretary — the letter ""S^ embroidered 
in silver, with two silver bars at each end of the frog. 

SHOULDER MARKS. (Pis. XIII and XIV.) 

For all commissioned officers and midshipmen: 

To be worn on the overcoat, mess jacket, and white service coat, 
the lower end secured at top of sleeve head seams, upper end near 
seam of collar. (See Pis. VII, IX, and X.) 

For tlit Ad in iral of the Navy and officer* of the rank ofrear-adm iral — 
to be of blue cloth, lined with black silk, worked over one thickness 
of haircloth or similar stiffening material. To be 4^ to 5i inches long 
on the side; 21 inches wide, with a symmetrical triangular peak at the 
top extending 1 inch beyond the parallel sides; at the center of this 
peak a small navy button. Top to be covered with 2-inch gold lace 
showing a margin of ^-inch blue cloth, and to have worked over the 
lace the same devices as on shoulder straps. 

F<>r captain*, commanders, lieutenant-commanders, lieutenants, and 
staff officers if correspond in g rank, except chaplains — the same as 
above, except that grade marks (including the star for line officers, 
and appropriately colored cloth between the gold-lace stripes for staff 
officers). similar to those on the sleeve of the service coat of the 
wearer shall be worn in place of the 2-inch gold lace: the stripes run- 
ning across the shoulder marks, the lower edge of the lower strip to 
be i inch from lower end of the shoulder mark. 

For officer* of or below the rank of lieutenant, junior grade — the 
same as above, but the lower edge of the lower strip of lace to be f 
inch from lower end of the shoulder mark. 

For chajdains — the same as for line officers of corresponding rank, 
but without the star, and stripes to be of lustrous black .mohair 
braid, instead of gold lace. (PL XIV.) 

SHOULDER KNOTS. (PI. XIV.) 

For uddshijiiiien — embroidered in gold on blue cloth, mounted on 
suitable stiffening, and with all attachments the same as for epaulets, 
all conforming to the pattern shown in PI. XIV. 

SHOULDER STRAPS. (PI. XIV.) 

For all commissioned officers except chaplains — of dark navy-blue 
cloth, mounted on suitable stiffening, with a border £ inch wide, 
embroidered in dead gold, as shown in PI. XIV. For the Admiral of 

2912—05 3 



32 UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, IT. S. NAVY. 

the Navy, the outside dimensions of the straps to be 4£ inches long- 
by If inches wide, the width of the embroidered border to be i inch. 
For all other' officer*, the straps to be 4^ inches long- by 1£ inches wide. 
The shoulder strap devices shall be the same as those prescribed for 
epaulets; for chief boatswains, chief gunners, chief carpenters, and 
chief sailniakers, the same as prescribed, respectively, for the collar of 
the service coat, but with one silver bar at each end of the strap for 
these officers, when retired with the rank of lieutenant, junior grade. 

SWORD AND SCABBARD. (PI. XVII.) 

For all officers except chaplains: 

A eut-and-thrust blade, not less than 26 nor more than 32 inches 
long; half basket hilt; grip white; scabbards of black leather; mount- 
ings of yellow gilt, and all as per pattern. 

SWORD KNOT. (PI. XVII.) 

For all commissioned officers, except chaplains, and for midshipmen: 

A strip of i-ineh gold lace, 24 inches long, doubled and bearing a 
gold slide, the ends of the strap inserted in a tassel of 12 gold bullions, 
If inches long, inclosing five blue bullions, and with basket-work head. 

FULL DRESS BELT. (Pis. XVIII and XIX.) 

For the Admiral of the Navy — to be of dark navy-blue cloth, 
embroidered on the edges with a gold stripe \ inch wide, in the center 
with one of half that width. Sling- straps of dark blue navy cloth, 
embroidered on each edge with a gold stripe i inch wide and in the 
center with one of half that width. 

For officers of the rank of rear-admiral — the same as above, but the 
stripes on edge of belt to be i inch wide; sling straps to have three 
£-ineh stripes, arranged as on the belt. 

For officers of the rank of captain or commander — to be of dark 
navy-blue silk webbing, with seven gold stripes ^\ inch wide, woven 
according to pattern; sling straps double, f inch wide, with buckle. 

For officers of th< j rank of lieutenant-commander or lieutenant — the 
same as above, but with five woven gold stripes. 

For commissioned officers of or below the rank of lieutetuint, junior 
grade, except those hereinafter noted — the same as above, but with three 
woven gold stripes. 

Chaplains, chief boatswains, chief gunners, chief carpenters, chief 
saihnakers, midshipmen, warrant officers, mates, and clerks, to have 
no full dress belt. 

Mountings for full dress belt and sling straps to be as shown in 
PI. XIX. 



UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 33 

UNDRESS BELT. (Pis. XVII and XIX.) 

For all officers except chaplains: 

To be of plain Mack grain leather, not less than If nor more than 
2 inches wide, with sling straps of the same, not less than i inch nor 
more than f inch wide, and attached to the belt as shown for the full 
dress belt, PL XVIII; mountings of belt the same as for the full dress 
belt, except the sling straps to have no buckles. The belt plate or 
buckle to be of yellow gilt in front, 2 inches in diameter, conforming 
to pattern. 

NAVY BUTTONS. 

To be giit, convex, and of three sizes in exterior diameter: large 
£ of an inch; medium, T V of an inch; and small, T \ of an inch. The 
device to conform to pattern, PL XVI. 

MOURNING BADGE. 

The mourning badge shall consist of a crepe band 3 inches wide and 
about 20 inches long, knotted upon the sword hilt, and a crepe band 3 
inches wide, worn on the left arm above the elbow. 

LEGGINGS. 

To be of the pattern supplied by the Bureau of Supplies and 
Accounts. 

RAIN CLOTHES. 

To be of black material. 

SCARF. 

For all officers except chaplains: 

To be of black silk or satin, 1£ to 2 inches wide, and is to be worn 
witb frock coat, tied four-in-hand style. 

BLACK TIE. 

To be of silk or satin, string, of uniform width, not less than f inch 
nor more than 1£ inches, and not less than 32 inches nor more than 36 
inches in length. 

SHIRTS. 

Onl} r plain-bosomed white shirts shall be permitted with those coats 
which are worn open, and in all cases no part of shirt not white shall 
be permitted to show. 

COLLARS AND CUFFS. 

• 

Plain white collars and plain white cuffs to be worn with all uni- 
forms, except in such weather or under such circumstances as the 
senior officer present shall permit their abandonment with service 
dress; plain standing collars to be worn with the special full dress and 
the. service coats. 



34 UNIFORM FOR OFFICERS, U. S. NAVY. 

GLOVES. 

Gloves shall be of white lisle thread. In cold weather white leather 
or heavy white cotton or woolen gloves may be worn. White kid 
gloves with white stitching- may be worn with evening dress or with 
special full dress. 

SOCKS. 

Plain black or plain white socks shall be worn with low shoes. 

SHOES. 

Shoes, high or low, shall be of black calfskin or patent leather, but 
with white trousers plain white shoes of canvas or buckskin shall be 
worn, except with ''dress'" uniform. 



PART III.— ENLISTED MEN'S UNIFORM. 

Section 4.— GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR ENLISTED MEN'S 

UNIFORMS. 

1. The naval uniform shall be worn by all enlisted men of the Navy 
when attached to vessels belonging to or employed by the Government 
and when .serving- at navy yards or stations. 

2. The particular dress for the da}' shall be fixed by the senior officer 
present, with due regard to the duty to be performed and the state of 
the weather. 

3. In orders prescribing the uniform to be worn, the designations 
(1) bine dres's, (2) bine undress, (3) white dress, (4) white undress, (5) 
hint working dress, and (<>) white tvorkhuj dress shall be used. 

4. Shoes neatly blacked shall always be worn v?\t\\ dress and undress, 
except that, with the latter, when decks are wet, or in hot climates, 
shoes may be dispensed with on board ship. 

5. Knife lanyards shall lie worn by all men of the seaman branch, 
except chief petty officers. 

6. Dungarees may be worn on board cruising ships — 

(a) By the engineer force while on duty in the engine and tirerooms; 

(I) By the gunner's gang and mechanics, only when engaged below 
at work that would damage the ordinary uniform; 

(c) Men wearing dungarees shall not appear on deck. 

Torpedo vessels' crews shall wear dungaree suits at all times, except 
when dress uniform is required. 

T. The jersey may be worn as an outer garment from sunset until 
<s a. m., either in place of the overshirt or jumper or over the over- 
shirt. During the day the jersey may be prescribed as an outer gar- 
ment for drills, exercises, or working parties, on board ship, in boats, 
or on shore at a navy -yard or naval station, to be. worn in place of or 
over the overshirt or jumper. The jersey may be worn under the 
overshirt only when prescribed. It shall never be worn without an 
undershirt. 

S. Overcoats may be worn with any of the prescribed uniforms in 
cold weather. 

35 



36 UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, IT. S. NAVY. 

9. Rain clothes and rubber boots ma} T be worn by all men belonging 1 
to the deck watches or boats' crews when exposed to inclement weather. 

10. Chief petty officers may take oft' the coat and waistcoat when 
on duty below the spar deck in warm weather. 

11. The watch cap may be worn at sea. It .shall not be worn during- 
the day watches in port except under special circumstances, such as 
foul or severe weather, cleaning, refitting, and coaling ship, and then 
only by permission of the. senior officer present. It shall not be worn 
by chief petty officers, stewards, officers' cooks, or bandsmen. 

12. White head gear shall be worn when white is prescribed for any 
other portion of the uniform. 

13. Underclothing shall always be worn. 

11. The hair and beard shall be worn neatly trimmed. If no beard 
or mustache is worn, the face shall be kept clean shaved. No eccen- 
tricities in the manner of wearing the hair and beard shall be allowed. 

15. The haversack is to be worn in rear of the left hip and the 
canteen in rear of right hip, with cartridge belt over loth haversack 
slings and the rear sling of the canteen. 

16. Leggings shall be worn, with any form of dress, when underarms 
for infantry or artilleiy drill or for duty with a landing party. 

17. Overshirts, jumpers, trousers, and underclothes shall be fitted 
with eyelets for stops. 

18. No transfer or exchange of clothing shall be made without the 
authorit} T of the commanding officer. When clothing belonging to 
deserters is sold the name of the deserter shall be obliterated by the 
master at arms with a stamp marked *'D. C," and the purchaser's 
name shall be placed upon it as soon as possible. 

19. Clothes made by the men for themselves shall conform strictly 
in material, pattern, and making-up to those issued by the paymaster, 
and no devices for chief petty officers' caps, rating badges, distinguish- 
ing-marks, apprentice marks, continuous-service stripes, braids, or cap 
ribbons, other than those issued by the paymaster, are to be used 
by enlisted men under any circumstances. Fancy and embroidered 
stitchings are forbidden. 

20. Commissary stewards shall wear the same uniform as chief 
commissary stewards, except that the rating badge shall bear the 
chevrons of a petty officer, first class, instead of a chief petty officer. 

21. Officers' cooks at work at the galley shall wear cooks' white 
caps and white aprons. 

22. Enlisted men to whom medals have been awarded shall wear 
them with dress uniform. The medal shall be worn attached to its 
ribbon, the upper edge of the ribbon to be in a horizontal line, on the 
left breast of the outer garment, 1 inch below the shoulder, the medal 
of honor to be placed farthest from the shoulder; the others in the 



UNIFORM FOK ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 37 

order, from right to loft, of occurrence of the occasions which they 
commemorate. 

23. A sick-list badge, an arnrband of white cotton, 2 inches wide, 
shall be issued by the medical officer to each enlisted man on the sick 
list, to be worn on the right arm above the elbow. The badge shall 
bo distinctly marked in black block figures, and the number shall be 
entered upon the sick list furnished for the use of the officer of the 
deck. When a man's name is removed from the sick list he shall 
return his badge, neatly washed, to the surgeon. 

24. The Geneva cross brassard, when circumstances require the 
observance of the agreement in regard to wearing it, shall consist of 
a band of white cotton, to be fastened around the upper part of the 
right arm, over the outer garment. Upon the band shall be painted 
or stitched a red Geneva cross. The band shall be 4 inches wide, the 
cross 3 inches in height and width, and the arms of the cross 1 inch 
wide. 

25. Standard samples of every article mentioned in these regula- 
tions shall be kept at the Naval Clothing Factory. The articles issued 
to ships shall conform in every respect to the standard samples, and 
no change shall be permitted without the sanction of the Secretary of 
the Navy. Pay officers of ships will be supplied with a set of paper 
patterns of sizes 3 and 5 of the overshirt, and 4. 8, and 12 of the 
trousers, for the use of enlisted men in making clothing. 

2ti. Copies of these regulations shall be posted in places where they 
may be consulted at all times by enlisted men. 

DRESS. (Pis. XX, XXI, XXIII.) 

To be worn on all occasions of ceremony. 

For chief petty officers, e.rcept bandmasters, and for stewards and 
officers* cool's: 
' Blue dress (PI. XX)— 

Blue cloth coat. 

Blue cloth trousers. 

Blue cap. 

Blue waistcoat. 

White shirt. 

White collar and cutis, and 

Black cravat. 
White dress (Pi. XXI) — 

White coat. 

White trousers. 

White cap. 

White shirt. 

White collar, and 

Black cravat. 



38 UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 

For bandsmen: 

Blue dress (PL XXIII)— 

Full-dress coat. 

Blue trousers. 

Helmet. 

White standing collar. 

Belt. 

Gloves (and for bandmaster, a sword). 
White dress — 

Same as blue dress, but with white trousers. 
For all at /if)' enlisted men: 
Blue dress (PI. XX)— 

Blue overshirt. 

Blue cloth trousers. 

Blue cap. 

Neckerchief. 

Knife lanyard (seaman branch only). 
White dress (PI. XXI) — 

Dress jumper. 

White dress trousers. 

White hat. 

Neckerchief. 

Knife lanyard (seaman branch only). 

UNDRESS. 

To be worn on ordinary occasions. 

For chief petty officers, except bandmasters, officer* steieards, and 
officers' 1 cools: 
Blue undress — 

Blue flannel or serge coat. 
Blue flannel or serge trousers. 
Blue cap. 

White shirt and collar, or blue flannel shirt. 
(Blue flannel or serge waistcoat permitted; also clothing that 
has been long in use as dress may be worn for undress.) 
White undress — 

Same as for dress, but clothing that has been long in use may 
be worn. 
For bandsmen (PI. XXIII): 
Blue undhess — 
Undress coat. 
Blue cloth trousers. 
Blue undress cap. 



UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MKN, U. S. NAVY. 39 

for bandsmen (PI. XXIII) — Continued. 

\Y*HITE UN DRESS 

White coat. 

White trousers. 

Cap with white cover. 

J-'or all other enlisted men: 
Blue undress — 

Blue overshirt. 

Blue cloth or flannel trousers. 

Blue cap (see paragraph 11). 

Neckerchief. 

Knife lanyard (seaman branch only). 
White undress — 

White undress jumper. 

White undress trousers. 

White hat. 

Neckerchief. 

Knife lanyard (seaman branch only). 

WORKING DRESS. 

To be worn by details of men, or by individuals, engaged in work for 

which this dress may be necessary. 
For chief ])etty officer*, txcejtt bandmaster*, officer* steward*, and offi- 
cers' cool's: 

Blue working dress — 

Same as blue undress, but the blue working dress prescribed 
for other enlisted men may be worn during work such as to 
require it. 
White working dress— 

Same as white undress, but the white working dress prescribed 
for other enlisted men may be drawn and worn during work 
such as to require it. 
For bandsmen: 

Blue working dress — 

Same as blue undress, but the blue working dress prescribed 
for other enlisted men may be worn during work such as to 
require it. 
White working dress — 

Same as white undress, but the white working dress prescribed 
for other enlisted men may be drawn and worn during work 
such as to require it. 
For all other enlisted men: 
Blue working dress — 
Blue working jumper. 
Blue cloth or Man.iel 'trousers. 



40 UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 

For all other enlisted men — Continued. 
Blue working dress — Continued. 
Blue cap. 

Neckerchief and knife lanyard will not be worn. 
White working dress — 
Same as white undress, but clothes that have been long in use 

may be worn. 
Neckerchief and knife lanyard will not be worn. 

BLUE COAT AND WAISTCOAT. (PI. XX.) 

For chief petty officers, except bandmaster: Coat to be of dark navy- 
blue cloth, double-breasted sack pattern, rolling collar, front and back 
of skirt to descend to top of inseam of trousers, lined with dark-blue 
flannel or black Italian cloth; a pocket in the left breast and one in 
each front near the bottom; four medium-sized gilt navy buttons on 
each breast, equally spaced, none to be placed under the collar. Coat 
to be worn buttoned. For undress, a flannel or serge coat of similar 
make may be worn. 

Waistcoat to be of same material as the coat, single-breasted, with- 
out collar, cut high in front, with 6 small-size gilt navy buttons, the 
upper button to be not more than 4 inches below the collar button in 
the neckband of the shirt. 

For officers' 1 stewards and officers' cooks: The same, except medium 
and small black navy buttons to be substituted for those of gilt. 

FULL-DRESS COAT. (PI. XXIII.) 

For bandsmen: Of single-breasted tunic pattern, to be made of 
scarlet cloth; skirt to extend to the point of the thumb, the arm 
hanging naturally, one row of S large navy fire-gilt buttons on the 
breast, placed at equal distances, and 2 in the back at end of waist 
seam. Standing collar of the same material, 1£ inches high (rounded 
ends), to hook in front at the bottom, to be pipe-edged around the 
top and base with ^-inch white cloth; the top of collar to be trimmed 
with i-inch yellow worsted lace. Pointed cuffs, 7 inches deep, of 
f -inch yellow worsted lace, to extend up the center of upper side of 
the sleeve, to be piped with ^-inch white cloth, with 3 small navy 
fire-gilt buttons on outer seam, spring of cuffs 2£ inches from edge of 
sleeves on each side. The tunic to be piped down the. front, around 
the bottom, and up the plaits of skirts to waist soam with i-inch 
white cloth. A white standing collar is to be worn with this coat. 

UNDRESS COAT.« (PL XXIII.) 

For bandsmen: To be made of dark indigo-blue flannel, dyed in the 
wool, cut half close so as to define the figure. No seam in center of 



a The undress coat for bandsmen will be the same as that for enlisted men of the 
Marine Corps. Changes for the latter will be followed by the former unless otherwise 
ordered. 



UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 41 

back, darts in fore part under the arms to extend to top of hip hone. 
Coat to be 1£ inches shorter than the full-dress coat. Body to be lined 
in fore part, and inside of shoulders covered with black Italian cloth- 
sleeves to be lined with drab jean. One row of seven medium navy 
tire-gilt buttons down the front, top button £ inch from base of collar,, 
lowest button about 9 inches from bottom of coat. Standing- collar 1^ 
inches high (rounded ends), to hook in front at the bottom. A white- 
metal lyre same as on helmet (PI. XXVIII, fig. 11) shall be worn on 
each side of the collar 1 inch from each edge in front. Shoulder straps 
of dark-blue flannel (inner ends rounded), 2 inches wide at sleeve head 
seams and 1 inch wide at collar seams, to be sewed down to fore part 
along shoulder seams, outer edges sewed in with sleeves, a small navy 
tire-gilt button on inner end. A three-pointed strap at center of upper 
side of each sleeve band of same material, to lie 5£ inches long, lower 
point along edge of sleeve band 2^ inches wide at each point, If inches 
wide at inside of curve between the points; a small navy fire-gilt but- 
ton sewed on each point; straight side of straps to be sewed down and 
turned over so as to make the points extend toward the back arm seams. 
The coat to be pipe-edged down the front, around the bottom, base of 
collar, shoulder straps, and sleeve straps with i-inch scarlet flannel, 
excepting the straight side of sleeve straps and outer edge of shoulder 
straps, which shall be plain. 

WHITE COAT. 

For chief petty officers, except bandmaster ; and for officers' 1 ' stewards 
and officers'' cooks: Bleached cotton drill of G^ to 7 ounces, of pattern 
heretofore described for the blue coats of the several ratings, but 
without lining, and pockets to be overlaid without flaps; the buttons 
to be medium-sized g-ilt ones for chief petty officers, and white for 
officers' 1 stewards and officers'' cooks, held by rings in e} T elets. 

For bandsmen ; To be made of G-ounce white linen duck, single- 
breasted sack pattern, with falling collar, a slip pocket on the inside 
of the left breast, running diagonally down from the opening, and to 
be fastened in front from neck to waist by six medium navy fire-gilt 
buttons held by rings in e}"elets. (PI. XXIII.) 

WHITE JACKET. 

For mess attendants: Of bleached cotton drill, of Gi to 7 ounces, 
single-breasted, five buttons, fly front; standing collar, 1 inch high, 
with rounded corners; buttons to be white and held in eyelets; no 
lining. This coat to be worn onty when on dut} T in officers 1 quarters. 

OVERSHIRT. (PI. XX.) 

For all enlisted men, except chief petty officers, officers' stewards, offi- 
cers] cooks, andbanchmen : Of dark navy-blue flannel, loose in the bod}-;, 
back and breast to be of double thickness, such double part to descend 
4 inches below the line of the shoulder blades, and to be cut with a 



42 UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 

deep .shield shape. X<d' opening to extend downward 7 inches. 
Sleeps to be from 17 to 22i inches in circumference, joining the body 
of the shirt as nearly as possible at the point of the shoulder; to be 
sewed to cutis in six box or double plaits, over lower edges of which 
the upper edges of cutis will be sewed. Collar of double thickness; 
to be from \) to 10 inches deep and from 14 to 18 inches wide, accord- 
ing to the size of the shirt, square corners; to be trimmed with 
three stripes of white linen tape T 3 ff of an inch wide and j\ of an 
inch apart, the outer stripe to be i of an inch from the edge, the stripes 
to extend down in front to the bottom of the neck opening; to have a 
plain five-pointed star, f of an inch in diameter, worked in white in each 
corner, its center to be H inches from inside (bottom and side) edges 
of inner stripe. Cuffs of double thickness, 3 inches deep, with wrist 
slits extending 3 inches above the upper edge of cutis; to be fastened 
with 2 small black navy buttons; to be trimmed around, except for 
1\ to 2 inches of the circumference with the cuff buttoned, with stripes 
of white linen tape T \ of an inch wide, as follows: For petty officers of 
the first, second, and third classes, enlisted men of the seaman first class, 
ship's cooks, first and second classes, and bakers, first class, three stripes, 
iof an inch apart, the middle stripe to be in the center line of the cuff'; 
for enlisted men of the seaman second class, ship's cooks, third and 
fourth classes, and bakers, second class, two stripes, \ of an inch apart, 
the middle line of the space between the stripes to come over the mid- 
dle of the cuff; for enlisted men of the seaman third class and mess 
attendants, one stripe, placed over the middle line of the cuff, the stripe 
ends of cuffs that are trimmed with two or three stripes to be joined 
by tape (see PI. XXI). A small jwcl'et to be let into the left breast with 
a straight opening, strengthened at each end by a crow's-foot, worked 
in black silk; lining of the pocket to be of .same material as shirt. 
The sizes of overshirts shall be as follows: 



Chest. Sleeve. 



Length of 
giument. 



Inches.. 
331 



46 


33| 
321 
311 
30i 
30 
291 
29 


33 


44 


32 


ii 


31 


40 


30 


39 


291 


38 


29 




282- 







DRES.S .JUMPER. (PI. XXI). 

For all enlisted men, except chief petty officers, officers' stevards, offi- 
cers' cooks, and bandsmen: Of bleached cotton drill of G£ to 7 ounces, 
to descend from 2 to 3 inches below the hip. Collar and cuffs of light 
quality, dark navy-blue flannel, double thickness, of same pattern, 
trimmed in same manner, and using the same buttons as on the blue 




BLUE TROUSERS. 
See ptiyt' 4$ u For all other enlisted men. 



% 



J 




WHITE TROUSERS. 
*SW )>(i(/c .',4 *' For all oilier enlisted men. 



UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 43 

overshirt; the doubling on back and breast, the sleeves, pocket, and 
crow's-feet to be made the same as in the blue overshirt, except that 
the materials will be white. 

UNDRESS JUMPER. (PI. XXII.) 

For all enlisted men, except chief petty officers, officers' stewards, offi- 
cers 1 cool's, and 'landsmen : Entirely of white unbleached drill of G£ to 
7 ounces; to descend from 2 to 3 inches below the hip; collar same size 
as that of blue overshirt; bottom of sleeves to be cut off square just 
abgve the wrists; pecket to be overlaid on the left side. 

BLUE WORKING JUMPER. 

For all enlisted men, except chief petty officers, officers' stewards, offi- 
cers' cool's, and landsmen: Same as undress jumper, except material to 
be blue flannel. Men ma} T be permitted to convert overshirts into this, 
garment, removing all tape and the stars, but not the watch mark. 

BLUE TROUSERS. (PL XX.) 

For chief petty officers, except bandmasters, and for officers' stewards- 
and officers" cools: Dark navy-blue cloth, made in the same manner as 
those for officers. For undress, flannel or serge trousers of similar 
make may be worn with flannel or serge coats. 

For bandsmen: For bandmaster, to be of sky-blue cloth, cut with 
medium spring; side pockets: to have one stripe of scarlet cloth 1 inch 
wide down the outer seams; edges of scarlet cloth to be welted. For 
musicians, the same as bandmaster, except that the scarlet cloth shall 
be a welt T \ of an inch wide. 

For all other enlisted men: Of dark navy-blue cloth; to fit snugly 
over the hip and down the thigh to 2 inches above the knee, from 
which point downward to be cut bell-shaped and full enough to be 
pulled over the thigh; one seam on each leg on the inside; wide 
turn-up hem at the bottom. Waistband to be 2 inches wide in front 
and H inches wide at the back, fastened in front by two buttons, the 
lower one serving also as the center button for the flap; to have a 
gusset at center of back 2 inches wide at top (when open) and -Lr to 
5i inches deep, including the band, with six to eight eyelet holes on 
each side, according to the size of the trousers, two of which shall be 
in each end of waistband, and a flat black silk lacing, f of an inch 
wide, run through them. The lacing is to be rove on one end, all 
parts showing outside to be parallel, ends of lacing tied at the top in 
a double bow. Flap to be 0| inches deep, with a crow's-foot worked 
in black silk at the lower corners; upper corners to be square; to 
have thirteen buttonholes around the sides and upper edge so arranged 
as to show seven across the top and four on each side. Pocket in 
waistband on each side. Small black navy buttons to be used. 



44 UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 

The sizes of trousers shall be as follows: 



Size. 


Waist. 


Inseam. 


Bottom. 


Knee. ' 


Seat. 


1 


Inches. 
40 
38 
36 
36 
35 
35 
34 
34 
34 
33 
32 
32 
31 
31 
30 
30 
29 


Inches. 
32 
33 
34 
32 
34 
33 
35 
32 
31 
33 
34 
32 
33 
31 
32 
31 
30 


Inches. 

m 

24 

24 

23£ 

24 

24 

24 

24 

23 

24 

24 

23i 

24 

23 

23i 

23 

221 


Inches. 
22i 
23 
23 
22£ 
23 
23 
23 
23 
22 
23 
23 
22J 
23 
22 
22| 
22 
21i 


Inches. 
43 


2 


42 


3 


40 


4 


41 


5 


40 


€ 


40 


7 


40 


8 


40 


9 


40 


10 


39 


11 


*" 38 


12 


38 


13 


37 


14 


37 


15 


36 


16 


36 


17 


35 







Flannel trousers to be cut and made the same as blue cloth trousers. 
WHITE TROUSERS. (Pis. XXI and XXII. ) 

For chief petty officers, except bandmaster, and for officers' stewards, 
and officers' 1 cooks: Bleached cotton drill, of 6£ to 7 ounces, cut and 
make-up similar to blue cloth trousers. 

For bandsmen: Of linen duck, the same as for enlisted men of the 
Marine Corps. 

For all other enlisted men: Of bleached cotton drill for dress trou- 
sers, and of unbleaehed cotton drill for undress, of 6£ to 7 ounces: 
shape, sizes, and make-up the same as for blue cloth trousers, but to 
be made with a fly front and top pockets. Lacing- in the back to be of 
f-inch eotton tape. 

DUNGAREES. (Pis. XXIV.) 

Jumpers to be made of blue denim of 6£ to 7 ounces; single-breasted, 
sack pattern, rolling collar, skirt to descend from 3 to 5 inches below 
the hip; to have two overlaid pockets, one on either side, the bottoms 
to be 1 inch above the lower hem, and to be buttoned to the neck by 
four black metal buttons; cuffs of double thickness, 2 inches deep, 
with wrist slits extending 4 inches above the upper edge of cuffs; each 
cuff to be fastened with one black metal button. 

The sizes of jumpers shall be as follows: 





Size. 


Chest. 


Sleeve. 


Length of 
garment. 


1 


Inches. 
48 
46 
44 
42 
40 
39 


Inches. 
34 
33| 
32i 


Inches. 
£8 


2 


28 


3 




28 


4 




31* 27 
304 26 


A 




C 




30 26 











UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 



45 



Trousers to be made of blue denim of about 6£ to 7 ounces; one seam 
on each leg on the inside; 11 y front, buttoned with four black metal 
buttons, and gusset at center of back secured with one metal buckle; 
two top pockets, and one patch pocket on the right hip. 

The sizes of the trousers shall be as follows: 



Size. 


Waist. 


Inscam. 


Bottom. 


Knee. 


Seat. 


1. 


Inches. 
40 
38 
36 
36 
35 
35 
34 
34 
34 
33 
32 
32 


Inches. 
33 
33 
34 
32 
34 
33 
35 
32 
31 
33 
34 
32 


Inches. 
21 
21 
21 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
19 
20 
20 
19 


Inches. 
22 
22 
22 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
20 
21 
21 
20 


Inches. 
43 


<> 


42 


3 

4 

5 

6. . 


40 
41 
40 
40 


7 : 


40 


8 


40 


9 


40 


10 .. 


39 


11 


38 


12 


38 







JERSEY. (PI. XXIV.) 

For all enlisted men: Knit, dark, navy-blue worsted dyed in the 
yarn, long enough to come well over the hip; to have full length 
sleeves, neck opening large enough to draw easily over the head; with 
a ribbed collarette of double thickness of worsted 2\ inches wide; total 
weight for the largest size to be not less than 1£ pounds; smaller sizes 
in proportion. 

OVERCOAT. (PI. XXV and XXVI.) 

For chief petty officers, except bandmaster: To be of heav} T , dark 
navy-blue cloth, lined with dark-blue flannel, the bottom of the skirt 
to reach to the knees, double-breasted, made to button to the neck, 
with rolling collar of the same material as the coat, and broad enough, 
when turned up, to protect the ears. Five large-size, black, navy 
buttons on each front, the lower buttons to be placed on a line a little 
below the opening of the horizontal pocket, the others to be equally 
spaced up to the throat. An outside pocket in each breast, the open- 
ings to be vertical, the middle to be about level with the elbow. A 
horizontal pocket, with flap cover, to be placed in each front below 
the line of the waist. Overcoat to be worn completely buttoned. 

For all other enlisted men, except bandsmen: The same as for chief 
petty officers, except length to be to the tips of the fingers extended, 
with the arm hanging naturally by the side. 

For bandsmen. (PI. XXVI): Sky-blue kersey; body lined with scar- 
let flannel, cut to the shape of the body; to extend down the leg from 
6 to 8 inches below the knee, according to the height of the wearer; 
to be slit up the back piece 1G inches; double-breasted, with two rows 
of large navy fire-gilt buttons on breast, seven buttons in each row, 
placed at equal distances apart; the distance between the rows to be 7 



46 UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 

inches at the top and 5 inches at the bottom, measured from the center 
of the buttons; lower border of coat to be felled. Sleeves loose with 
two rows of stitching to represent cuffs 5 inches deep; three small 
navy fire-gilt buttons on each curl'; the cuffs of bandmaster's overcoat 
sleeves to bear chevrons of the pattern and material prescribed for 
drum major in the Marine Corps. Collar 5 inches deep, to stand or 
fall, to hook in front. To have seven hooks under the collar, to which 
the cape will be attached. 

Cape. — Circular, cut of one piece of sky-blue kerse3 T ; lined with 
scarlet flannel; to extend to the edge of the coat sleeve, the arm hang- 
ing naturally; to close in front with five small navy fire-gilt buttons; 
to have seven eyes on the upper border hx which it will be fastened to 
the coat. On parade the corners of the cape shall be turned back and 
hooked together behind. 

RAIN CLOTHES. (PI. XXVII.) 

For all enlisted men: Hat, coat, and trousers of black painted mate- 
rial, of same pattern as Cape Ann suits. 

Such petty officers as neither go aloft nor go in boats are permitted 
to wear, in lieu of the coat and trousers above described, a long coat 
of black painted material, extending at least 6 inches below the knees. 

FLANNEL SHIRT. . 

For chief petty officers, officers' stewards, officers' cool's, and bcmds- 
■men: Dark navy-blue flannel, with a small turn-down collar of the 
same material; three small-size black navy buttons on front and one 
on each cuff. 

WHITE SHIRT, COLLARS, AND CUFFS. 

For chief petty officers, officers' sttwards. officers' cooks, and hands- 
men: Plain white linen or cotton shirts of ordinary pattern. Plain 
white collars and cuffs. 

UNDERSHIRTS. 

For all enlisted men: Heavy: To be knitted of wool and cotton, in 
such proportions as to prevent shrinkage, and to be bleached white; 
elastic collarette on neck opening, with no buttons; long sleeves. 
Light: to be of same material and description as heavy undershirt, 
except that the yarns shall be sufficiently light to make the garment 
about one-half the weight of the heavy undershirt. Sleeves not to 
come below the elbow and to be so made that they will not rl creep." 1 
Cotton undershirts of identical pattern maybe worn in warm climates, 
at the discretion of the commanding officer. 

Blue undershirts of heavy navy flannel or other similar material, 
with the neck opening fastened in front by buttons, may be made by 
the men themselves, and worn by the engineer force on duty in the 
engine and lire rooms. 



UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, It. £. NAVY. 



47 



DRAWKRS. 

For all enlisted men: Hear//: To bo of same materia] as heavy 
undershirt. Crotch to be double and stayed. Light: To bo of the 
same material as the lio-ht undershirt, and to be in weight about one- 
half that of the heavy drawers. 

BLUE CAP. (PI. XXVIII.) 

{a) For chief petty officers, except b«n<lnu.Lster {figs. If. and 7): Dark 
navy-blue cloth, band of lustrous black mohair; visor of black patent 
leather, bound with same, green underneath: chin strap of black pat- 
ent leather, \ inch wide, fastened at the side with two small gilt navy 
buttons, and provided with one gilt and one leather slide. There 
shall be two small eyelet ventilating holes in each side of the quarters. 
The device shall be of metal, consisting of the letters U S N in silver 
upon a slightly inclined gilt foul anchor. 

(l>) For officers' steward* and officers' cooks: Cloth, braid, and visor, 
the same as for chief potty officers, but the chin strap to have two 
leather slides, and to be fastened with two small-sized black navy 
buttons: no device. 

{<■) For handsmen {jigs. S and 10): Same as for enlisted men of the 
Marine Corps, excepting that a lyre device of white metal, same as for 
helmet, shall be worn in front, and the side buttons shall lie small navy 
tiro-gilt buttons. White cap covers are to be made of white linen, the 
same as for enlisted men of the Marine Corps. 

(d) For all other enlisted men {fig. 2): Of dark, navy-blue cap cloth; 
band of finished cap to be '2 inches wide and lined with a thin bather 
sweat band. Quartering* to be in four pieces, and, in the finished 
cap. to be from If to 2 inches in width, sewed together with double 
seams and without any slack cloth. Crown cut in one piece to corre- 
spond with the outer diameter of the quartering, 1 ?: to be lined with 
suitable material and sewed to the quartering*? with a double seam. 
A plain double bow of ribbon, about 5^ inches long, of the same 
shade, quality, and width as the cap ribbon, to be sewed through its 
center to the left hand side; ends of cap ribbon to be attached to 
center of bow; ends of bow to be free and cut in a plain swallow tail. 



Sizes. 


Diameter 
of crown 
(on top 
with grum- 
met in). 


Width of 
quarter- 
lies. 


64, 6| 


Inches. 
10± 
10| 
10? 
11 
11? 


Inches. 

li 
11 


6?, 6| 


7, T % 


7J, 7§ 


1J 


7i, ?i 


2 








2912—05 4 









48 UNIFORM FOR P^NLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 

Grom met: Of steel corset wire not less than £ nor more than \ inch 
wide, covered with sheeting- or other suitable material. 

Gap ribbon: Black silk ribbon H inches wide. The name of the 
vessel to which the wearer is attached, in plain block letters £ inch in 
height, preceded by the letters U. S. S., to be woven in gilt thread 
through the ribbon. The ribbon is to be fastened to the cap by two 
straight rows of stitching, close together, and close and parallel to the 
upper edge of the ribbon, and two of the same close to the lower edge. 

WHITE CAP. 

For chief petty officers {except hind master), and for officers'* stewards* 
and officers' cooks {fys. 1 and 6): To be skeleton cap, having band 
covered with navy-blue cloth; band to be 2 inches wide, suitably stiff- 
ened, with a welt T 3 g of an inch from lower edge. Visor, chin straps, 
and buttons to be same as in caps of bine cloth. The cover to be 
separate, and to be made of G£ to 7 ounce bleached drill. The band 
thereof to be If inches wide, the bell of the crown to be in two pieces 
and Lf inches wide, with two lap seams on sides over the buttons, and 
sewed to top of crown by a lap seam. The lower edge of cover to rest 
on welt in blue cloth band. 

WHITE HAT. 

For all other enlisted men, except bandsmen : Of well-shrunken 
bleached cotton drill of 6£ to 7 ounces, made at the Naval Clothing- 
Factory, of the pattern shown in PI. XXVII J, tig. 5. 

WATCH CAP. 

For all enlisted men, except chief petty officers, officers' stewards, 
officers' cooks, and bandsmen (fy. o): Knit of dark navy-blue worsted, 
to be all wool, closely woven, conical in shape, 10 inches long, with a 
hem 2i inches deep at the bottom. 

BLACK HELMET. 

For bandsmen (fas. 9 and 11): The same as for enlisted men of the 
Marine Corps, including spike, spike base, and chin strap, the device 
to conform to pattern shown in the plate, with the white metal lyre 
device & of an inch long and j inch broad, soldered in the center of 
lower part of shield. 

RATTNC BADGES. (PI. XXIX.) 

To consist of a spread eagle above a specialty mark and a class 
chevron. 

The chevrons are to be made of stripes of scarlet cloth * inch wide, 
separated } inch, and sewed Hat without padding by an overlook stitch 



UNIFORM FDK ENLISTED MEN, V. S. NAVY. 49 

of scarlet silk on the edges of the chevrons. The badge as made up to 
cover a Held 3| inches broad; the specialty mark to be in the center of 
the field in the angle of the upper stripe, and the eagle to be l{ inches 
above the angle and just above the specialty mark. 

Chief petty officers to wear three stripes, with an arch of one stripe 
forming the arc of a circle between the ends of the upper stripe of the 
chevron, the outside radius of the circle being If inches; the specialty 
mark to be in the center of the held under the arch; the eagle to rest 
on the center of the top of the arch (fig. 1). 

Petty officers, first class, to wear three stripes in the chevron (tig. 2). 

Petty officers, second class, two stripes (tig. 3). 

Petty officers, third class, one stripe (fig. 4). 

For bine clothing the eagle and specialty marks are to be embroid- 
ered in white, and for white clothing in blue, except for hospital 
stewards and hospital apprentices, first class, the specialty marks for 
these being of red cloth for both blue and white clothing, laid on the 
same as chevrons. 

For permanent petty officers holding three consecutive good-conduct 
badges, the chevrons are to be made of gold lace, instead of scarlet 
cloth. 

The specialty marl's for different ratings to be as shown in PI. XXX, 
as follows: 

RATINGS. 

1. Master at arms. 

2. Boatswains' mate;?, coxswains. 

3. Quartermasters. 

4. Blacksmiths, ship litters. 

5. Sail makers' mates. 

6. Printers. 

7. Carpenters, plumber and fitters, painters. 
S. Turret captains. 

9. Gunners' mates. 

10. Chief yeomen. 

11. Yeomen, first, second, and third classes. 

12. Electricians. 

13. Machinist's mates, boiler makers, water tenders, coppersmiths, oilers. 

14. Hospital stewards, hospital apprentices (red cloth). 

15. Bandmaster, musicians. 

16. Commissary stewards. 

The rating badge shall be worn by all petty officers Of the star- 
board watch on the right sleeve, midway between the shoulder and 
elbow; by all petty officers of the port watch, on the left sleeve. The 
rating badge shall be worn on the blue coat and white coat of chief 
petty officers; the full dress, undress, and white coats of bandmasters 
and first musician; the overshirt, and the dress and undress jumpers 
(white) of other petty officers. 



50 UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, IT. S. NAVY. 

DISTINGUISHING MARKS. (PI. XXXI.) 

To be embroidered in white on blue for blue clothing, and in blue 
on white for white clothing - . 

Seaman-gunner marl: (tig. 4): Every enlisted man who has qualified 
as a seaman gunner is to wear the distinguishing mark so placed that 
the top comes I inch below the point of the chevron, or, if not a petty 
officer, in place of the rating badge. 

Gun-captain mark (tig. 1): An enlisted man regularly detailed by 
the commanding officer of the vessel as a gun captain, except at a 
secondary battery gun, shall wear the distinguishing mark (a gun) on 
the other arm than that on which the watch mark or rating badge is 
worn, midway between the shoulder and elbow, axis horizontal, muzzle 
pointing to the f rout. 

Gun-pointer marl' (tig. 5): An enlisted man who has qualified as a 
gun pointer, second class, shall wear this mark on the other arm than that 
on which the watch mark or rating badge is worn, midway between the 
shoulder and elbow. For a gun jwinter^frst c/ass, the mark to be the 
same, with a star (tig. 2) 1 inch above it, one ray pointing up. 

Hospital apprentice mark (PI. XXX, tig. 14): A Geneva cross of 
red cloth, the crossbars 1 inch long and -k inch wide, to be worn by 
hospital apprentices in place of the rating badge prescribed for petty 
officers. 

Apprentice marl'" (PI. XXXI, tig. 3): A figure of -eight knot, 2 inches 
long, to be worn by all enlisted persons who have passed through the 
rating of apprentice in the Navy. On the overshirt and the dress and 
undress jumpers it is to be worn on the breast, 2 inches below the neck 
opening, and on all coats, except overcoats, it is to be worn on the 
outside of the same sleeve as the rating badge, halfway between the 
elbow and wrist. 

Watch mark: To be worn on the overshirt and the dress and undress 
junipers, except by potty officers and mess attendants. 

A strip of braid § inch wide, white on overshirts and blue on jump- 
ers, placed on the shoulder seam of the sleeve and extending entirely 
around the arm. For firemen and coal passers, the braid to be red on 
both blue and white clothes, and of tin 1 same width and disposition as 
above. The men of the starboard watch to wear the mark on the 
right sleeve: those of the port watch on the left sleeve. 

( 'ontiinioiis-srrrice stri]>(-K (PI. XXI): To be worn by all continuous- 
service men on the left sleeve, on blue and white coats, overshirts, and 
dress jumpers; to be made of scarlet cloth 8 inches long, the side edges 
turned under until they meet on the under side-, each stripe to show 
a width of % inch; when more than one. stripes to be \ inch apart; to 

« This mark will nut he worn by apprentice seamen or those who have passed 
through that rate. 



UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 51 

he stitched on the sleeve diagonally across the outside of the fore- 
arm, at an angle of 45°; on coats, the lower end of the first stripe 
to he not less than 2 inches from the cntt'.end of the sleeve; on the 
overshirt and dress juniper, the lower end of the first stripe to lie 
4 inches above the upper edge of the cuff; one stripe for each com- 
plete term of enlistment of three or four years under continuous 
service. For permanent petty officers holding three consecutive good- 
conduct badges, the continuous-service stripes are to be made of gold 
lace, instead of scarlet cloth. 

BUTTONS. 

(jilt: The same as for officers" uniforms. 

Black (PI. XXXI): Large size. If inches in diameter: medium 
size, i inch; small size, £ inch. 

White (for officers' stewards' and officers* cooks' white coats, and 
mess attendants' white jackets): Three-fourths of an inch in diameter 
with shank and ring: design, an anchor in outline. 

BANDSMEN'S EQUIPMENTS. (PI. XXXII.) 

Shoulder knot*: To consist of a plaited strap, of two rows of gold 
cord, for bandmaster, and of white mohair braid for other bandsmen, 
and a pad of scarlet cloth, surrounded by a metal fire-gilt crescent; to 
have 1 a small navy fire-gilt button on the inner end of the strap, and ;i 
white-metal lyre device li inches long and 1 inch broad on the center 
of the pad, to be secured to the full-dress coat by epaulet fastenings; 
the pad to be wadded to a thickness of f of an inch. 

AiyuiUettes: For bandmaster, to be of gold cord, i inch in diameter. 
For other bandsmen, to be of white mohair cord, i inch in diameter. 

Sword: The sword, sword belt, belt plate, and frog for bandmasters 
shall be of the pattern worn by field musicians of the Marine Corps. 

CRAVAT. 

For chief petty officers, officers" stewards, and officer* cooks: Of black 
ribbed silk, not more than 3(5 nor less than %*2 inches long and not more 
than H inches nor less than i inch wide, of uniform width, to be tied 
in a double bowknot. 

NECKERCHIEF. 

For all enlisted men except chief petty officers, officers" steay/rds. 
officer* cooks, and bandsmen; Of black silk 30 inches square. To be 
tied in a square knot, leaving ends from 4 to inches long, the knot 
to be directly under neck opening of overshirt. 



52 UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, IT. s. NAVY. 

KNIFE LANYARD 

For all enlisted men of the seaman branch except el def petty officers: 
Of bleached white cotton; to be flat sennit, \ to T \ of an inch wide, 
tightly laid up: to have a turk's-head slide; and to be long enough, 
when around the neck, to allow the knife to be used with arm extended. 

GLOVES. 

For bandsmen; White gloves, of the pattern worn by enlisted men 
in the Marine Corps, shall be worn with full dress. 

For all other enlisted men: Woolen gloves, iron gray in color, of 
fast dye, of weight about 2£ ounces to the pair, to be worn with over- 
coats on dress occasions and liberty, and generally in cold weather. 

BATHING TRUNKS. 

To be of pattern furnished by the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts. 
They shall always be worn by members of the crew who are bathing* 
from the ship, when so directed by the officer in command. 

SOCKS. 

For all enlisted men: Of blue, all wool, or unbleached cotton, to be 
sufficiently long to come w T ell up on the calf of the leg. 

SHOES. ' 

tor all enlisted men: Of black calfskin; both high and low; heels 
broad and low; soles broad and thick; strongly curved on outside and 
straight on inside; thin leather lining on soles; the tongue to be vamped 
in and stitched up on one side; shoe strings to be of strong leather; 
rubber soles and heels permitted. 

White shoes of the same pattern may be worn by chief pett} r officers 
with white trousers, and also by other enlisted men in the Philippine 
Squadron, when prescribed by the commanding officer. 

RUBBER BOOTS. 

Of best rubber, leg pieces coming np at least to the knee. 

LEGGINGS. 

For all enlisted men: Khaki-colored cotton duck, with strip of 
leather going under the shoe and fastening on the outer side of leg- 
ging with a buekle. 



UNIFORM FOR KNLISTFD MEN, U. S. NAVY. 53 

MARKING CLOTHING. 

Every article of clothing- .shall be legibly marked with the owner's 
name, using black paint in marking white clothes, and white paint for 
marking bine clothes, as follows: 

Blankets. — All the right-hand corners, -L inches from each edge. 

Cloth raj>. Inside crown. 

Drau\rx. — On the outside of the right half waistband. 

Dungaree trousers. — Same as blue trousers. 

Jerseys. — Same as undershirt. 

Jtimptr*. — Ou the inside, on the hem, across the center line of the 
front, and to the right of the center line of the back; also on the under- 
side of the collar. 

Leggings. -Inside on centerpiece 3 inches from and parallel to top. 

Mattress. — In center. Four inches from each end. 

Mattress carer.— Right corners -i inches from open end. 

jYeckerch ief. — In center. 

Ot'ercoat. — On lining, each side of split of tail H inches from and 
parallel to bottom. 

Ore /-shirts. — On the outside of front and on the inside of back, both 
marks being placed 1 inch from the bottom of the shirt, the former 
across the center line; also on the underside of the collar. 

Rain clothes. — Same as dungarees. Particular care should be taken 
that rain clothes are kept distinctly marked at all times. 

Rubber boots. — Inside near the top. 

Shoes. — Inside near the top. or cut initials in sides of heels. 

Socks. — On leg, near top. 

Trousers. — On the inside of the back of both legs close to the 
bottom hem. 

Undershirts. — On the outside of the front 1 inch from the bottom 
of the shirt and to the right of the center. 

Watch caj). — Inside, one-half inch from bottom. 
White hat. — On the sweat band. 

CLOTHING LISTS. 

Such portion of the outfit prescribed for recruits on transfer to a 
training ship as the climate and season, duty to be done, and other 
circumstances render advisable, is to be issued to recruits when re- 
ceived on enlistment. 

When men are received on board a cruising vessel their outfits, are 
to be at once completed. In the case of men drafted from a receiv- 
ing ship to a vessel on a foreign station the outfit is to be completed 
before the men leave the receiving ship. 

Nothing in these regulations is to be construed to mean that a man 
shall not own more clothing than the outfit requires, provided he 
desires to do so. 



54 



UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, U. S. NAVY. 



The outfit of heavy clothing- may be reduced in the Philippine squad- 
ron at the discretion of the squadron commander. 



Outfit. 



Blue coat , 

Waistcoat 

Full-dress coat , 

Undress coat , 

White coat 

White jacket a , 

Overshirt 

Dress jumper 

Undress jumper 

Blue working jumper . 

Blue trousers , 

White trousers 

Dungarees , 



Jersey 

Overcoat 

Rain clothes <l 

Flannel shirt 

White shirt 

Undershirts: 

Heavy 

Light' 

Drawers: 

Heavy 

Ligh t 

Blue cap, complete 

White cap 

White hat 

Watch ca p 

Black helmet 

Rating badges 

Shoulder knots pair. 

Aiguillettes 

Knife lanyard e 

Leggins pair. 

Cravat 

Neckerchief 

Gloves ; pair. 

Socks do . . . 

Shoes do. . . 

Rubber boots do. . . 

Mattress 

Mattress covers 

Shoe brush and blacking 

Blankets pair. 

Towels 



On board vessels in general service, and 
for the crews of training ships. 



Chief petty 
officers, 
officers' 
stewards, 
and offi- 
cers' cooks. 



Bands- 
men. 



Other 

petty 

officers. 



All 

other 

enlisted 

men. 



2 
1 
3 

1 



Recruits 
on trans- 
fer to 
training 
ship. 



M ! 64 

As required by rating and according to class of 
vessel . 



/I 

1 



/l 
1 
2 
1 
1 



SI 
l 
2 
1 
1 



1 



1 

C'l 

4 

2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 



a Officers' mess attendants only. 

(> One pair to be white dress. 

<"To be drawn when the weather requires. 

d Deck force only. 

'Seaman branch only. 

/Except officers' stewards, officers' cooks, and officers' mess attendants. 



o 



PLATE I. 




ADMIRAL OF THE NAVY. 

SPECIAL FULL DRESS. 



PLATE 




CAPTAIN. REAR ADMIRAL. 

SPECIAL FULL DRESS. 



PLATE III. 





LIEUTENANT. MIDSHIPMAN. 

FULL DRESS. 



PLATE IV. 




LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER. 
DRESS. 



PLATE V. 




UNDRESS-A. 



PLATE VI. 




LIEUTENANT. BACK. REAR-ADMIRAL, FRONT. 

SERVICE DRESS. 



PLATE VII. 




LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER. 

WHITE SERVICE DRESS. 



PLATE VIII. 




PLATE IX. 




MESS DRESS. 



UNIFORM-C. 



PLATE X. 




OVERCOAT. 



CLOAK. 




= Zi x 




LL 52 



PLATE XVII. 




SWORD, SCABBARD, UNDRESS BELT, SWORD KNOT. 



PLATE XVIII. 




REAR-ADMIRAL. 

CAPTAIN OR COMMANDER. 

LIEUTENANT (JUNIOR GRADE) OR ENSIGN. 



FULL DRESS BELTS. 



PLATE XIX. 




MOUNTINGS FOR FULL-DRESS BELT. 



PLATE XX. 





CHIEF PETTY OFFICER. BOATSWAIN MATE, FIRST CLASS. 

BLUE DRESS. 



PLATE XXI. 




COXSWAIN. 



CHIEF PETTY OFFICER. 



WHITE DRESS. 



PLATE XXII. 




WHITE WORKING DRESS. 



PLATE XXIII. 




BLUE DRESS. 



WHITE UNDRESS. 
BANDSMAN. 



BLUE UNDRESS. 



PLATE XXIV. 




DUNGAREES. 



JERSEY. 



PLATE XXV. 




SEAMAN. 



CHIEF PETTY OFFICER. 



OVERCOAT. 



PLATE XXVI. 




OVERCOAT WITH AND WITHOUT CAPE. 

MUSICIAN. 



PLATE XXVI 





SEAMAN. 



PETTY OFFICER. 



RAIN CLOTHES. 



PLATE XXIX. 




RATING BADGES, BLUE. 

1 CHIEF MASTER-AT-ARMS; 2. BOATSWAIN'S MATE, FIRST CLASS; 3, GUNNER'S MATE, 
SECOND CLASS; 4. QUARTERMASTER, THIRD CLASS. 



PLATE XXX. 




SPECIALTY MARKS ON RATING BADGES. 



PLATE XXXI 




DISTINGUISHING MARKS BUTTONS. 

1, GUN CAPTAIN; 2 AND 5, GUN POINTER; 3, EX-APPRENTICE; 4, SEAMAN GUNNER. 



PLATE XXXII 




BANDMASTER'S EQUIPMENTS. 



Page 50. 
Insert alter paragraph beginning " Gnu-pointer mark:" 

The Navy E: To be worn by members of turret, gnu, and torpedo 
crews that make exceptionally high scores on record target practice, 
as designated by the Bureau of Navigation. 

The letter "E" embroidered in block-letter style five-eighth inch 
high, one-half inch wide, lines of the letter one-eighth inch wide. 
Worn on the arm; by rated men, 1 inch below the point of the chev- 
ron or 1 inch below the seaman gunner's mark; by men not rated, on 
the right arm in place of rating badge. 

Pace 51. 

Ln the eighth line, after the word "stripes,*' insert the words "on 
blue clothing." 

Page 52. 

Under ''Socks." " For all enlisted men.*' Strike out the entire 
paragraph and substitute therefor the following: 

• l For all enlisted men: Of black, wool and cotton mi^ed, or cotton, 
to conform to the standard sample, and to be sufficiently long to come 
. ell up on the calf of the leg. 

Under "Shoes,' 1 in the first paragraph, third line, after the word 

tongue," insert "for high shoes." Add to same paragraph "To 
conform to standard as adopted." 

Page 53. 

First paragraph, under "Clothing lists,*' in first line change "to" 
to "from," and in the second change "ship" to "station," so 
us to read "* * * recruits on transfer from a training station 

* * * " ■ 

Page 51. 

"Outfits." After rubber boots add reference letter "d." 
General heading for first, second, third, and fourth columns, change 
comma to period after "service," and strike out the words "and for 
the crews of training ships." 

In last column change heading to read "Recruits on transfer from 
training station." 

In last column prefix reference letter "c" to entry under the fol- 
lowing: 

Dress jumper. White trousers. 

Undress jumper. Jersey. 

Undershirts: Drawers: 

Heavy. Heavy. 

Light. Light. 

Change footnote "c" to read as follows: "Dependent upon the 
season. Winter clothing noi required in summer, nor summer cloth- 
ing and white in winter." 

Plate XXII. 

Strike out the words "Working dress" and insert therefor 
" Undress." 

Plate XXII 1. 
"White undress — Landsman."' Mark "Incorrect." (Same as 
for enlisted men of the Marine Corps."